Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 30th or search for August 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

y into Smithfield; the infantry soon put them back. August 29.--Night very cold, clear; inspection; to-day is supposed to be fraught with weal or woe to the Confederacy; the Chicago Convention meets; 10 A. M. into line and moved toward Smithfield; heavy cannonading; lay in line all day in reserve; General Early sent us word he had men enough; so back to camp; toward evening drew half ration of mutton; appointed with Captain and Lieutenant McCollister on ordnance board; acted; euchre. August 30.--Clear; inspection; on O. B.; on picket in evening; got a letter from my sister, greatest treat I have had for months; they are faring better in Yankee hands than I expected; how I do wish we could effect an honorable peace, and all that are spared return to their several avocations; had I my own way it would take but little welding to convert my sword into a reaping-hook. August 31.--Clear. Skirmishing on our left; roasting-ears ad libitum; relieved about sundown; back and formed new
of a communication which, on the tenth instant, I addressed and delivered to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange. Under the circumstances of the case, I deem it proper to forward this paper to you, in order that you may fully understand the position which is taken by the Confederate authorities. I shall be glad if the proposition therein made is accepted by your Government. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had again appeared at Varina. On the following day I sent to Major Mulford the following note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: On the tenth of this month I addressed you a communication, to which I have received no answer. On the twenty-second I also addressed a communication to Major-General E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange, enclosing a copy
of a communication which, on the tenth instant, I addressed and delivered to Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange. Under the circumstances of the case, I deem it proper to forward this paper to you, in order that you may fully understand the position which is taken by the Confederate authorities. I shall be glad if the proposition therein made is accepted by your Government. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had again appeared at Varina. On the following day I sent to Major Mulford the following note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: On the tenth of this month I addressed you a communication, to which I have received no answer. On the twenty-second I also addressed a communication to Major-General E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange, enclosing a copy
looked like members of a phonographic alphabet. The troops to-day were placed on three quarter rations, to provide against any emergency. They are getting abundance of roasting-ears, so their dinners will have bulk as well as nutrition. August 30.--We get the direction of Atlanta to-night by looking toward the north star. We are now directly south of the city, between the West Point and Macon railroads, and so near the latter — the last artery of the Gate City--that we must strike it th corps, four miles south, to Camp creek, and camped. August 28.--Marched south-east three miles, to Red Oak station on West Point railroad, striking this road twelve miles south-west from Atlanta. August 29.--Lay still and fortified. August 30.--Marched to Shoal creek, five miles. August 31.--The Army of the Tennessee fighting to day in front and on west of Jonesboroa, Georgia; our corps advanced east; met cavalry behind works on east bank of Flint river. My brigade was formed, N
t by a minnie-ball. On the thirtieth the First and Third divisions (Brigadier-Generals Merritt and Wilson) concentrated at Berryville, Virginia. The First division (Brigadier-General Merritt) moving across country to the Summit Point and Berryville pike. The Third division (Brigadier-General Wilson) moving down the Winchester and Berryville pike. On the thirty-first August and first of September, the cavalry remained in the same position in the vicinity of Berryville as on the thirtieth of August. On the morning of the second of September the cavalry moved back to Charlestown, Virginia, in two columns; the First division (Brigadier-General Merritt) via the Charlestown and Berryville pike, and the Third Division (Brigadier-General Wilson) via Kabletown. At 5 P. M., same day the First and Third divisions (Brigadier-Generals Merritt and Wilson) moved to Berryville by the Winchester and Berryville pike. The next morning (the third) at daylight, both divisions moved via Mi