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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 296 296 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 15 15 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for October, 1864 AD or search for October, 1864 AD in all documents.

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the army waiting for them; and when they did join us, and we came up to the rebels, General Meade changed his mind, again refused to attack, and marched the army back to Culpepper. Shortly after this campaign I was ordered to the Department of the Missouri, and my connection with the Army of the Potomac ceased. campaign of Price in Missouri. The rebel General Price, with twenty-five thousand men and eighteen pieces of artillery, invaded the State of Missouri, from Arkansas, in October, 1864. He attacked the field-work near Pilot Knob, in the south-eastern part of the State and, although he was repulsed, the garrison abandoned the work and fled to Rolla, some sixty miles to the south-west, where two brigades of cavalry were stationed. Price then moved up toward Franklin, and threatened Saint Louis. General A. J. Smith's command was thrown out to Franklin to cover that place, when Price turned off to Jefferson City, destroying the railroads as he went along; and, on arrivin
ntered into by General Johnston and Major-General Sherman in the terms asserted, I could not acknowledge its application to my command, or its obligation upon me till notified to that effect by specific instructions from proper authority, authentically transmitted. My forces, although known as the cavalry corps of the military division of the Mississippi, organized under General Sherman's orders, had not served under his direct command since I separated from him at Gaylesville, Ala., in October, 1864. He at that time directed me to report to Major-General Thomas, with my troops, for the purpose of completing the organization and assisting in the operations against Hood and Forrest. From that time till my arrival at this place all of my operations were conducted under instructions either directly from General Thomas or transmitted through him from Lieutenant-General Grant. But I fully expected to join the armies operating in the Carolinas and Virginia, and therefore to be under and
casions gave me their valuable assistance, who so industriously labored to execute every duty promptly, and who always behaved with gallantry, I return my sincere thanks. They all joined with me in the deep grief felt at the loss sustained by the army, and the friendly ties broken by the death of their fellow staff officers, Colonel Tolles, Chief Quartermaster, and Assistant Surgeon Ohlenschlaeger, Medical Inspector, who were killed while on their way from Martinsburg to Cedar creek, in October, 1864, and in that of the death of the gallant Lieutenant Meigs, my Chief Engineer, who was killed while examining and mapping the country near Bridgewater just above Harrisonburg. This young officer was endeared to me on account of his invaluable knowledge of the country, his rapid sketching, his great intelligence, and his manly and soldierly qualities. I would also here especially mention the loss of two of my most efficient staff officers, Lieutenant-Colonels Kellogg and O'Keefe, both