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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
both lie buried in the State of Ohio. Maternal ancestry of John Brown. Owen Brown, the last named of these sons, and the father of Captain John Brown, the grea He left two sons and four daughters, of whom Ruth, the eldest child, married Owen Brown, the father of our hero. John Brown born. The town records of Torrington supply these dates: Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of February, A. D. 1793. Anna Ruth Brown, dut people on their Western Reserve. One of our nearest neighbors there was Mr. Owen Brown, who had removed to Hudson, not long before, from Connecticut. I remember d half strangled with at word stuck in his throat, without remembering good Mr. Owen Brown, who could not speak without stammering, except in prayer. moved to Ohio; tBrown, January 19, 1823, Hudson, Ohio; married Ellen Sherboudy, July, 1847. Owen Brown, November 4, 1824, Hudson, Ohio; he escaped from Harper's Ferry. Frederick
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the child and his ancestors. (search)
ived and died on the old homestead in Canton, Connecticut, while Frederick and Owen both lie buried in the State of Ohio. Maternal ancestry of John Brown. Owen Brown, the last named of these sons, and the father of Captain John Brown, the greatest and most heroic of the race, married the daughter of Gideon Mills, who was himcan army, and died in 1813, at Barkhamsted, Connecticut, at the age of sixty-four. He left two sons and four daughters, of whom Ruth, the eldest child, married Owen Brown, the father of our hero. John Brown born. The town records of Torrington supply these dates: Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of February, A. D. 1793. Anna Ruth Brown, daughter of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in the town of Norfolk, the 5th day of July, 1798. John Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born on the 3
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: the father of the man. (search)
er of 1826-7. I was then five years old. My father's family lived that winter at Hudson, Ohio, which was then one of the remotest of the settlements made by Connecticut people on their Western Reserve. One of our nearest neighbors there was Mr. Owen Brown, who had removed to Hudson, not long before, from Connecticut. I remember him very distinctly, and that he was very much respected and esteemed by my father. He was an earnestly devout and religious man, of the old Connecticut fashion; and early in the summer of 1807, and returned to Connecticut in 1812, so that I rarely saw any of that family afterwards, I have never to this day seen a man struggling and half strangled with at word stuck in his throat, without remembering good Mr. Owen Brown, who could not speak without stammering, except in prayer. moved to Ohio; then a wilderness filled with wild beasts, & Indians. During the long journey which was performed in part or mostly with an ox team; he was called on by turns to assis
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
udson, in Ohio. In order to make no interruptions in the narrative, or confusion of dates, I subjoin here the family record as it stood at John Brown's death. By his first wife, John Brown had seven children: John Brown, junior, July 25, 1821, at Hudson, Ohio; married Wealthy C. Hotchkiss, July, 1847. He now lives in Ashtabula County, Ohio; now fully recovered from his once dangerous malady. Jason Brown, January 19, 1823, Hudson, Ohio; married Ellen Sherboudy, July, 1847. Owen Brown, November 4, 1824, Hudson, Ohio; he escaped from Harper's Ferry. Frederick Brown, (1st,) January 9, 1827, Richmond, Pennsylvania; died March 31, 1831. Ruth Brown, February 18, 1829, Richmond, Pennsylvania; married Henry Thompson, September 26, 1850. Friederick Brown, (2d,) December 21, 1830, Richmond, Pennsylvania; murdered at Osawatomie by Rev. Martin White, August 30, 1856. An infant son, born August 7, 1832, was buried with his mother three days after his birth. By his secon
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
Leeman at Tabor. Our party now consisted of Captain John Brown, Owen Brown, A. D. Stephens, Charles Moffitt, C. P. Tidd, Richard Robertson, ays at Tabor, making preparations to start. Here ce found that Captain Brown's ultimate destination was the State of Virginia. Some warm worefore, at which place they had been left, awaiting the order of Captain Brown. There were, also, other stores, consisting of blankets, clothm there transported to a house in Washington County, Md., which Captain Brown had rented for six months, and which was situated about five miles from Harper's Ferry. It was the intention of Captain Brown to sell his teams in Springdale, and, with the proceeds, to go on with the rere we pursued a course of military studies. Col. H. Forbes and Captain Brown had some words, and he (Col. F.) did not come on; consequently, two false statements; that some warm words passed between Cook and Brown; and that there was a good deal of wrangling between the Captain, a
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: assembling to conspire. (search)
ds moved to strike out the same. Reynolds spoke in favor, and Brown, Monroe, Owen Brown, Delany, Realf, Kennard, and Page against striking out. The question was thenwent into balloting for the election of Treasurer and Secretary of Treasury. Owen Brown was elected to the former office, and George B. Gill to the latter. The following resolution was then introduced by Mr. Brown, and unanimously passed. Resolved, That John Brown, J. H. Kagi, Richard Realf. L. F. Parsons, C. H. Tidd, C. Whipple, C. W. Moffit, John E. Cook, Owen Brown, Steward Taylor, Osborn Anderson. A. M. Ellsworth, Richard Richardson, W. H. Leeman, and John Lawrence, be, and are hger, Charles H. Tidd, John A. Thomas, C. Whipple, J. D. Shadd, Robert Newman, Owen Brown, John Brown, J. H. Harris, Charles Smith, Simon Fislin, Isaac Holley, James Sagi. Members of Congress-Alfred 31. Ellsworth, Osborn Anderson. Treasurer — Owen Brown. Secretary of Treasury--Geo. B. Gill. Secretary of State--Richard Realf.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Saturday, may 8, 1858-- (search)
s carried. The President then proceeded to administer the obligation, after which the question was taken on reading of the plan proposed by Mr. Brown, and the same carried. The plan was then read by the Secretary, after which, on motion of Mr. Whipple, it was ordered that it be now read by articles for consideration. The articles from 1 to 45 were then read and adopted. On reading of the 46th, Mr. Reynolds moved to strike out the same. Reynolds spoke in favor, and Brown, Monroe, Owen Brown, Delany, Realf, Kennard, and Page against striking out. The question was then taken and lost, there being but one vote in the affirmative. The article was then adopted. The 47th and 48th articles, with the schedule, were then adopted in the same manner. It was then moved by Mr. Delany that the title and preamble stand as read. Carried. On motion of Mr. Kagi, the Constitution, as a whole, was then unanimously adopted. Mr. Whipple nominated John Brown for Commander-in-Chief, who wa
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Monday, may 10th, 1859-- (search)
Monday, may 10th, 1859--9 1/2 P. M. The Convention assembled and went into balloting for the election of Treasurer and Secretary of Treasury. Owen Brown was elected to the former office, and George B. Gill to the latter. The following resolution was then introduced by Mr. Brown, and unanimously passed. Resolved, That JMr. Brown, and unanimously passed. Resolved, That John Brown, J. H. Kagi, Richard Realf. L. F. Parsons, C. H. Tidd, C. Whipple, C. W. Moffit, John E. Cook, Owen Brown, Steward Taylor, Osborn Anderson. A. M. Ellsworth, Richard Richardson, W. H. Leeman, and John Lawrence, be, and are hereby, appointed a Committee, to whom is delegated the power of the Convention to fill by electionOwen Brown, Steward Taylor, Osborn Anderson. A. M. Ellsworth, Richard Richardson, W. H. Leeman, and John Lawrence, be, and are hereby, appointed a Committee, to whom is delegated the power of the Convention to fill by election all offices specially named in the Provisional Constitution, which may be vacant after the adjournment of the Convention. The Convention then adjourned sine die. Signed, J. Kagi, Secretary of the Convention
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: sword in hand. (search)
peland, (colored,) held the lower part of the town and the rifle works; Cook, Owen Brown, Tidd, Merriam, and Barclay Coppoc were stationed at the cabins of the Kennehe corners of the streets and the public buildings. Early in the morning Captain Brown sent an order to the Wager House for breakfast for forty-five men his hosta they recognized my voice, and called me. I found them to be Charles P. Tidd, Owen Brown, Barclay Coppic, F. J. Merriam, and a negro who belonged to Washington or Alsue of our comrades, and it was finally determined to return to the house of Captain Brown. I found that Tidd, before leaving the school house to go for Brown, CoppBrown, Coppic, and Merriam, had stationed the negroes in a good position in the timber back of the school house. On his return, however, they could not be found. We therefore left for Captain Brown's house. Here we got a few articles which would be necessary, and then went over into the timber on the side of the mountain, a few yards be
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
The God of my father take you for his children. Your affectionate father, John Brown. Note.--The remittance referred to was unquestionably intended for Owen Brown, who escaped from Harper's Ferry, but is supposed to be destitute even of a change of clothing. The significant allusion in the letter shows that the father wamy children and my wiffe may remain there as residents. I give to my son Jason Brown my silver watch with my name engraved on inner case. I give to my son Owen Brown my double-spring opera-glass, and my rifle gun, (if found,) presented to me at Worcester, Mass. It is globe-sighted and new. I give also to the same son fifty dning balance that may become my due from my father's estate may be paid in equal amounts to my wife, and to each of my children, and to the widows of Watson and Owen Brown, by my brother. John Avis, Witness. John Brown. A final codicil. Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., Dec. 2, 1859. It is my desire that my wife ha