Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Gerritt Smith or search for Gerritt Smith in all documents.

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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
r 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York. This person says Gerritt Smith gave him a large tract of land there. He says he knows it because he saw the deed. ... Mir.ly removed to North Elba, in Essex County, New York, in 1849. It was about this time that Mr. Gerritt Smith, the eminent philanthropist, offered to colored settlers his wild lands in that district ont. At this period, writes a friend, John Brown appeared one day at Peterboroa, and said to Mr. Smith: I see, by the newspapers, that you have offered so many acres of wild land to each of the col them on my land, and will look after them in all ways, and will be a kind of father to them. Mr. Smith accepted the generous proposal, gave John Brown the land, and allowed him to make the experimewhere should he find his men? He came to the Adirondack to look for them. Ten years ago, Gerritt Smith gave to a number of colored men tracts of ground in the Adirondack Mountains. The emigrants
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. (search)
er when he lived here. This person informs me that he came here from Akron, Ohio, in the spring of 1846, and engaged in the business of wool-dealing. He was afterwards associated in business with a Mr. Perkins, of Ohio. and their firm was Perkins and Brown. They sold large quantities of wool on commission; most of it was for farmers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here in 1850 or 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York. This person says Gerritt Smith gave him a large tract of land there. He says he knows it because he saw the deed. ... Mir. Brown's integrity was never doubted, and he was honorable in all his dealings, but peculiar in many of his notions, and adhering to them with great obstinacy. Mr. Brown was a quiet and peaceable citizen, and a religious man. Rev. Mr. Conklin, who was settled here in the North Congregational Church, and who separated himself in a great measure from other ministers because he thought them culpabl
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
John Brown and his family removed to North Elba, in Essex County, New York, in 1849. It was about this time that Mr. Gerritt Smith, the eminent philanthropist, offered to colored settlers his wild lands in that district of the Adirondack wildernehere to make the experiment. At this period, writes a friend, John Brown appeared one day at Peterboroa, and said to Mr. Smith: I see, by the newspapers, that you have offered so many acres of wild land to each of the colored men, on condition th will also employ some of them on my land, and will look after them in all ways, and will be a kind of father to them. Mr. Smith accepted the generous proposal, gave John Brown the land, and allowed him to make the experiment, although he had neverns, he knew himself; but where should he find his men? He came to the Adirondack to look for them. Ten years ago, Gerritt Smith gave to a number of colored men tracts of ground in the Adirondack Mountains. The emigrants were grossly defrauded b
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the Lord's first call. (search)
as held in a county adjoining Essex, New York, in the summer of 1855. When in session, John Brown appeared in that convention, and made a very fiery speech, during which he said he had four sons in Kansas, and had three others who were desirous of going there, to aid in fighting the battles of freedom. He could not consent to go unless he could go armed, and he would like to arm all his sons; but his poverty prevented him from doing so. Funds were contributed on the spot; principally by Gerritt Smith. He had only two objects in going to Kansas: first, to begin the work for which, as he believed, he had been set apart, by so acting as to acquire the confidence of the friends of freedom, who might thereby subsequently aid him; and, secondly, because, to use his own language, with the exposure, privations, hardships, and wants of pioneer life, he was familiar, and thought he could benefit his children, and the new beginners from the older parts of the country, and help them to shift
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: In caucus and camp. (search)
t he was too earnest a man, and too devout a Christian, to rest satisfied with the only action against slavery consistent with one's duty as a citizen, according to the usual Republican interpretation of the Federal Constitution. That teaches us that we must content ourselves with resisting the extension of slavery. Where the Republicans said, Halt; John Brown shouted, Forward! to the rescue! He was an abolitionist of the Bunker Hill school. He followed neither Garrison nor Seward, Gerritt Smith nor Wendell Phillips: but the Golden Rule, and the Declaration of Independence, in the spirit of the Hebrew warriors, and in the God-applauded mode that they adopted. The Bible story of Gideon, records a man who betrayed him, had manifestly a great influence on his actions. He believed in human brotherhood and in the God of Battles; he admired Nat Turner, the negro patriot, equally with George Washington, the white American deliverer. He could not see that it was heroic to fight again
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: making ready. (search)
at Westport, Essex County, New York--near home. On his journey there, he staid over at Peterboroa, the residence of Gerritt Smith, and at Rochester, where he delivered a public speech and met the brave negro, Shields Green, or Emperor. In May he th the long beard of one of them, and called over to learn who they were and where they came from. Brown registered as Smith and two sons, from Western New York, and told Mr. Singling, the landlord, that they had got tired of farming in that regi We strike at higher and wickeder game, said Mr. Hunter-acted, Captain Brown. On one occasion a neighbor remarked to Mr. Smith (as Old Brown was called) that he had observed twigs and branches bent down in a peculiar manner, which Smith explainedSmith explained by stating that it was the habit of the Indians, in travelling through a strange country, to mark their path in that way, so as to find their way back. He had no doubt, he said that Indians passed over these mountains, unknown to the inhabitants.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: State evidence. (search)
meant. He replied, We don't want to injure you or detain your train. You could have gone at three o'clock: all we want is to free the negroes. I then asked if my train could now start, and went to the guard at the gate, who said, There is Captain Smith; he can tell you what you want to know. I went to the engine house, and the guard called Captain Smith. The prisoner at the bar came out, and I asked him if he was captain of these men. He replied he was. I asked him if I could cross the brCaptain Smith. The prisoner at the bar came out, and I asked him if he was captain of these men. He replied he was. I asked him if I could cross the bridge, and he peremptorily responded, No, sir. I then asked him what he meant by stopping my train. He replied, Are you the conductor on that train? I told him I was, and he said, Why, I sent you word at three o'clock that you could pass. I told him that, after being stopped by armed men on the bridge, I would not pass with my train. He replied, My head for it, you will not be hurt; and said he was very sorry. It was not his intention that any blood should be spilled; it was bad manag
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
ceding his sublime victory over death, is from the pen of a very prejudiced authority, but bears, nevertherless, internal evidences of its truthfulness: Colonel Smith, of the Virginia Military Institute, paid a visit to John Brown to-day, in company with Mr. O. Jennings Wise, son of Governor Wise, who is attached to Company e conversation that took place between Captain Brown and these gentlemen, and I give you, word for word, what transpired during our interview: Reporter. Did Colonel Smith question Brown as to whether he had my desire to have a clergyman to administer to him the consolations of religion? Jail Official. Yes, he did; but Brown sg him as a martyr to the anti-slavery cause, he carefully files away. Referring to his execution this morning, during his conversation with Mr. O. J. Wise and Colonel Smith, he said he was not to be executed, but publicly murdered. Reporter. Does he profess any religion? Official. Yes; he says he is a member of the Congregat