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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 30 16 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 28, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Akron (Ohio, United States) or search for Akron (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
, Richfield, Ohio. Amelia Brown, June 22, 1845, Akron, Ohio; died October 30, 1846. Sarah Brown, (2d,) September 11, 1846, Akron, Ohio. Ellen Brown, (1st,) May 20, 1848, Springfield, Massachusetts; died April 30, 1849. infant son, April 26, 1852, Akron, Ohio; died May 17, aged 21 days. Ellen Brown, (2d,) September 25, 1851, Akron, Ohio. Thus, eight children now survive ; four by each wife. The young tanner. From his twenty-when in Kansas. In 1844, John Brown removed to Akron, Ohio; in 1846, he went to Springfield, Massachusetts; Brown about the year 1836; soon after my removal to Akron, he became a client of mine; subsequently a resident of the township in which the town of Akron is situated; and, during a portion of the latter time, a member of e. This person informs me that he came here from Akron, Ohio, in the spring of 1846, and engaged in the busine 1851 John Brown and his family returned to Akron, Ohio, where he managed Mr. Perkins's farm, and carried
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
cember 23, 1843, Richfield, Ohio. Amelia Brown, June 22, 1845, Akron, Ohio; died October 30, 1846. Sarah Brown, (2d,) September 11, 1846, Akron, Ohio. Ellen Brown, (1st,) May 20, 1848, Springfield, Massachusetts; died April 30, 1849. infant son, April 26, 1852, Akron, Ohio;Akron, Ohio; died May 17, aged 21 days. Ellen Brown, (2d,) September 25, 1851, Akron, Ohio. Thus, eight children now survive ; four by each wife. TAkron, Ohio. Thus, eight children now survive ; four by each wife. The young tanner. From his twenty-first to his twenty-sixth year, John Brown was engaged in the tanning business, and as a farmer, in Ohio.ked around him when in Kansas. In 1844, John Brown removed to Akron, Ohio; in 1846, he went to Springfield, Massachusetts; where, in the finted with John Brown about the year 1836; soon after my removal to Akron, he became a client of mine; subsequently a resident of the township in which the town of Akron is situated; and, during a portion of the latter time, a member of a Bible class taught by me. In these relation
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. (search)
e wrote for legal assistance, will show the estimation in which he was held by the conservative men with whom he came in contact in his business relations there. John Brown in Springfield. Your letter asking for such information as I am able to give you respecting John Brown is received, and in order to enable me to answer it more fully than I could otherwise have done, I have called upon a man who was his bookkeeper when he lived here. This person informs me that he came here from Akron, Ohio, in the spring of 1846, and engaged in the business of wool-dealing. He was afterwards associated in business with a Mr. Perkins, of Ohio. and their firm was Perkins and Brown. They sold large quantities of wool on commission; most of it was for farmers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here in 1850 or 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York. This person says Gerritt Smith gave him a large tract of land there. He says he knows it because h
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
get, and said briefly, I sometimes think that is what we came into the world for — to make sacrifices. And I know that the murmuring echo of those words went with me all that day, as we came down from the mountains, and out through the iron gorge; and it seemed to me that any one must be very unworthy the society which I had been permitted to enter who did not come forth from it a wiser and a better man. From the family we learn that: 1851 John Brown and his family returned to Akron, Ohio, where he managed Mr. Perkins's farm, and carried on the wool business. In 1855, on starting for Kansas, he again moved his household to North Elba, where they still reside, and where his body lies buried. At the Agricultural Fair of Essex County, for 1850, a great sensation was created by the unlooked — for appearance on the grounds of a beautiful herd of Devon cattle. They were the first that had been exhibited at the county festival, and every one was surprised and delighted
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the Lord's first call. (search)
by it. Instead of deterring, it incited emigration. Among the brave pulses thus stirred were those of the family of old John Brown. In 1854, the four eldest sons of John Brown, This is a quotation from a manuscript in John Brown's handwriting, found at his house near Harper's Ferry. named John, Jr., Jason, Owen, and Frederick, all children by a first wife, then living in Ohio, determined to remove to Kansas. John, Jr., sold his place, a very desirable little property near Akron, in Summit County. The other two sons held no landed property, but both were possessed of some valuable stock, (as were also the two first named,) derived from that of their father, which had been often noticed by liberal premiums, both in the State of New York and also of Ohio. Jason Brown had a very valuable collection of grape vines, and also of choice fruit trees, which he took up and shipped in boxes at a heavy cost. The two first named, John and Jason, had both families. Owen had none. F
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
e papers at the Kennedy Farm, gives an outline of his movements after starting for the Territory. Journal of one of Brown's sons. The journal, which opens on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 1857, is contained in an ordinary-sized account book, upon the fly-leaf of which is impressed a circular stamp, inscribed Tabor, Fremont County, Iowa, and around the rim the name of Jason Jones, Notary public. The first entry, of Aug. 25, states that the writer started at a certain date in June for Tabor, from Akron to Hudson; got goods at Henrichs, &c. ; harness ; bought red mail stage at Jerries ; next day went to Cleveland; shipped chest by express; staid at Bennett's Temperance House; next day went to church through the day and evening. July 4, the entry is, Father left for Iowa City, where he was joined by Jason, on h the 5th, who records a meeting with Dr. Bowen, Mrs. Bowen, and Jessie and Eliza Horton. The entries until the 10th record the purchases of wood for spears, staples, chains for
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
ry, but is supposed to be destitute even of a change of clothing. The significant allusion in the letter shows that the father was confident of Owen's safety.--Akron (Ohio.) Beacon. Letter to an Ohio clergyman. Jail, Charlestown, Wednesday, Nov. 23, 1859. Rev. McFarland. Dear Friend: Although you write to me as a stra uncared for. But God will be a husband to the widow, and a father to the fatherless. I have frequently been in Wooster; and if any of my old friends from about Akron are there, you can show them this letter. I have but a few more days, and I feel anxious to be away, where the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are at r, O., if he can be found; also, fifty dollars to a man of Storck County, O., at Canton, who sued my father in his lifetime, through Judge Humphrey and Mr. Upson of Akron, to be paid by J. R. Brown to the man in person, if he can be found. His name I cannot remember. My father made a compromise with the man by taking our house and