Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 5 document sections:

James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
Ellen Brown, (1st,) May 20, 1848, Springfield, Massachusetts; died April 30, 1849. infant son, to Akron, Ohio; in 1846, he went to Springfield, Massachusetts; where, in the following year, his f wool Factors. John Brown went to Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1846. The following extract fro business relations there. John Brown in Springfield. Your letter asking for such informationst thus writes of John Brown's character in Springfield: While a resident of this city Brown ised him up. A correspondent who visited Springfield in 1847, and saw John Brown there, thus recspent a Sunday at the American House, in Springfield, Mass. A stranger who had seen my name on the easons that induced John Brown to remove to Springfield. The best authenticated records, thus far rers combined against him. He had at Springfield, Massachusetts, a large deposit of graded Western w him in a large woollen warehouse in Springfield, Massachusetts, where he was known as a quiet, mode
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
hio; died September 27, 1843. Anne Brown, December 23, 1843, Richfield, Ohio. Amelia Brown, June 22, 1845, Akron, Ohio; died October 30, 1846. Sarah Brown, (2d,) September 11, 1846, Akron, Ohio. Ellen Brown, (1st,) May 20, 1848, Springfield, Massachusetts; died April 30, 1849. infant son, April 26, 1852, Akron, Ohio; died May 17, aged 21 days. Ellen Brown, (2d,) September 25, 1851, Akron, Ohio. Thus, eight children now survive ; four by each wife. The young tanner. From his twHe waited patiently. learn to wait: I have waited twenty years, he often said to the young men of principle and talent, who loved and flocked around him when in Kansas. In 1844, John Brown removed to Akron, Ohio; in 1846, he went to Springfield, Massachusetts; where, in the following year, his family joined him. A few life notes now are all that can be given here. John Brown's favorite books, texts, and hymns. My dear father's favorite books, of an historical character, writes a dau
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. (search)
s and Brown, wool Factors. John Brown went to Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1846. The following extract from a private ontact in his business relations there. John Brown in Springfield. Your letter asking for such information as I am ableocal journalist thus writes of John Brown's character in Springfield: While a resident of this city Brown was respectede that God raised him up. A correspondent who visited Springfield in 1847, and saw John Brown there, thus records an incido me that I spent a Sunday at the American House, in Springfield, Mass. A stranger who had seen my name on the register of unts of the reasons that induced John Brown to remove to Springfield. The best authenticated records, thus far produced, go nd manufacturers combined against him. He had at Springfield, Massachusetts, a large deposit of graded Western wools, and he1848 we find him in a large woollen warehouse in Springfield, Massachusetts, where he was known as a quiet, modest man, of u
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
individuals. I will endeavor to make a judicious and faithful application of all such means as I may be supplied with. Contributions may be sent, in drafts, to W. H. D. Calender, Cashier State Bank, Hartford, Conn. It is my intention to visit as many places as I can during my stay in the States, provided I am informed of the disposition of the inhabitants to aid me in my efforts, as well as to receive my visit. Information may be communicated to me, (care of Massasoit House,) at Springfield, Mass. Will editors of newspapers, friendly to the cause, kindly second the measure, and also give this some half dozen insertions? Will either gentlemen or ladies, or both, volunteer to take up the business? It is with no little sacrifice of personal feeling I appear in this manner before the public. John Brown. In February, when in Collinsville, Connecticut, he ordered the manufacture of his pikes. I remember that, when in Boston, he spoke with great contempt of Sharpe's rifles as
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Exodus. (search)
will hallow his memory, and history will name him the Cromwell of our Border Wars. How unlike the Old Brown sketched by fiendish hate is the man at your fireside!--his mouth unpolluted with tobacco, strong drinks abjured, regimen plain, conversation grave, and occupied with pleasant memories of other days. He drops a tear of gratitude on the mention of the practical kindness of to him in the hour of extremity. He recurs to the solid principles and hearty affection of Dr. Osgood, of Springfield, on whose ministry he attended for many years. He had a lucrative occupation as wool grower and dealer in Ohio, and gained a medal as exhibitor of wool at the World's Fair; and now finds himself in the wool business still, in a land where men find more dreaded foes than the young Hebrew shepherd found in the beasts that took a lamb out of the flock. I am well informed that the people at Grinnell took care of the company for two days, furnishing them food for their journey, and, on Sabba