Browsing named entities in L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. You can also browse the collection for Grierson or search for Grierson in all documents.

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Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admi............................ 367 Rallying a Flying Brigade .............3.................. 368 Night Scene in a Hospital ...................................... 370 How the Soldiers Took their ease in their Inn ................. 373 Incidents of Grierson's Raid .................................. 376 Foraging ........ . ................................. 377 Adventure of a Spy ............................................ 389 The Religious Sentiment in the Army ............................ 394 Pars
l Foster. 25. General Terry. 26. General Sykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69
. 346 The Farmer's Contribution to the Chicago Sanitary Fair........... 356 The Vicksburg Scow. A Ballad ............ ..................... 363 Miss Melvina Stevens, the East Tennessee Heroine ................ 365 Somebody's Darling ............................................ 367 Rallying a Flying Brigade .............3.................. 368 Night Scene in a Hospital ...................................... 370 How the Soldiers Took their ease in their Inn ................. 373 Incidents of Grierson's Raid .................................. 376 Foraging ........ . ................................. 377 Adventure of a Spy ............................................ 389 The Religious Sentiment in the Army ............................ 394 Parson Brownlow's Daughter and the Rebel Soldiers................ 397 General Banks and the Military Speculators ...................... 398 A Woman's Pluck and Patriotism ......... .. .................... 400 (iving for the Wounded Soldiers....... ......
Incidents of Grierson's raid. While several of the Union scouts were feeding their horses at the stables of a wealthy planter of secession proclivities, the proprietor looking on, apparently deeply interested in the proceeding, suddenly burst out with: Well, boys, I can't say I have any thing against you. I don't know but on the whole, I rather like you. You have not taken any thing of mine except a little corn for your horses, and that you are welcome to. I have heard of you all over the sable to represent themselves as Jackson's cavalry, a whole company was very graciously entertained by a strong secession lady, who insisted on whipping a negro because he did not bring the hoe cakes fast enough. On one occasion, seven of Colonel Grierson's scouts stopped at the house of a wealthy planter, to feed their jaded horses. Upon ascertaining that he had been doing a little guerilla business upon his own account, our men encouraged him to the belief that, as they were the invincible