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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
quent victory Sheridan had, as those familiar with the history of the campaigns of the Army of the Shenandoah will recollect, repeatedly defeated Early during the previous month, driving him with heavy loss across and southward from the Opequan creek, on the 19th of September, and sending him whirling through Winchester; routing him — at Fisher's Hill on the 22d of September, and sending his troops in rapid flight and disorder up the valley to Harrisonburg; had fixed the new cavalry general, Rosser, on the 8th of October, and repelled with heavy loss a covert attack made by Early from North mountain, on the 12th of October. Supposing that the rebel general had been sufficiently punished to be willing to remain quiet, General Sheridan made a flying visit to his out-stations along the newly repaired Manassas Gap Railroad, and thence to Washington, from whence he hastened back to his command, and, on the night of the 18th of October, reached Winchester. But Early, restless and dissat
quent victory Sheridan had, as those familiar with the history of the campaigns of the Army of the Shenandoah will recollect, repeatedly defeated Early during the previous month, driving him with heavy loss across and southward from the Opequan creek, on the 19th of September, and sending him whirling through Winchester; routing him — at Fisher's Hill on the 22d of September, and sending his troops in rapid flight and disorder up the valley to Harrisonburg; had fixed the new cavalry general, Rosser, on the 8th of October, and repelled with heavy loss a covert attack made by Early from North mountain, on the 12th of October. Supposing that the rebel general had been sufficiently punished to be willing to remain quiet, General Sheridan made a flying visit to his out-stations along the newly repaired Manassas Gap Railroad, and thence to Washington, from whence he hastened back to his command, and, on the night of the 18th of October, reached Winchester. But Early, restless and dissat