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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 3: in camp at Meridian Hill. (search)
ichigan men were forced to do guard duty with sticks until fitted out by the general government, as they brought no muskets with them. The Nineteenth Regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Frederick W. Lander and ordered to march to Poolesville, Md., then the headquarters of that division, known as the Corps of Observation, Gen. Charles P. Stone, commanding. The march was from Washington through Leesboro, Rockville and Darnestown. It was the first march made by the men and to the tef the march the men camped by the side of a stream. Supper was cooked with water taken from this stream and on the following morning a dead mule was found above the camp, it having been in the middle of the stream for at least three days. Poolesville was reached on the following evening, and the men were greeted by the members of the Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment, and the various companies of that organization entertained the corresponding companies of the Nineteenth. They had been war
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 4: the balls Bluff disaster. (search)
ttery fire a couple of shells over into the rebel camp. This was done, but no response was made to their Hellish Good-Night, and in a few hours Camp Benton was reached. The report of the operations in and around Ball's Bluff, made shortly afterward by Colonel Hinks, occasioned considerable feeling and attracted almost universal remark and comment from the Northern press and people on account of its plain statement of the important affair. In a letter to Adjt. Schouler, written from Poolesville, Camp Benton, October 29, 1861, Colonel Hinks says: The Nineteenth regiment did not lose a man in the battle of the 21st at Ball's Bluff, nor in the skirmish at Edward's Ferry on the 22nd. At the place first named, it stayed the advance of the enemy, receiving its full fire as it took its position and covered the retreat in good order. With two companies of the Twentieth, commanded by Lieutenants Beckwith and LeBaines, and the Rhode Island Battery, Captain Vaughn, it held possessio
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 5: life at camp Benton. (search)
Chapter 5: life at camp Benton. On returning to the camp at Poolesville, on October 24 the second day after the battle of Ball's Bluff, it was found that the wound of Gen. Lander and the capture of Col. Lee left Col. Hinks in command of the Fid in rapid improvement in the regiment, as is evidenced by the following letter: Headquarters Corps of Observation, Poolesville, Nov. 13, 1861. Lieut. Col. Devereux, commanding. 19TH Mass. Vols. Sir:— The general commanding directs me to eg its selections the delightful melody of Fair Harvard in their honor. The chief thing of interest, beside work, at Poolesville seemed to be to stockade the tents and to build a fire-place which would not smoke the occupants out. Capt. Rice constouse and had it built about five feet from the ground. In this tables were built, the lumber having been brought from Poolesville. The company had previously built an oven in which to bake their beans and their meat. This was now used to roast po
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 6: removal to Muddy Branch. (search)
These were to protect the ford and lock at Whitehouse on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Long after the regiment left this vicinity, these blockhouses played a conspicuous part in preventing raids across the river. As two towns, Rockville and Darnestown, required a provost guard, Company A, Capt. Merritt, was given the duty. In addition the camp and stores of the regiment demanded a quarter guard. A bakery for the regiment was erected and flour instead of stale bread, was drawn from Poolesville, Levi Woofindale, of Company G, being appointed regimental baker The headquarters of the regiment were located in an old wooden building and here also were the quarters of the Adjutant, Quartermaster and Surgeon. Tents scattered about the building were used for the non-commissioned staff and men detailed at headquarters. The balance of the regiment were housed in tents. Guard mounting took place each morning. The band was still with the regiment, and the players had a hard time in
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 7: the winter at Muddy Branch. (search)
a fire in his quarters, dressed in clothing furnished by the officer on duty. It was in December, and he was not only nearly drowned but as nearly frozen to death. The man proved to be Governor William Sprague, of Rhode Island, on his way to Poolesville to visit some batteries from his state which were stationed there. He had taken a notion to ride up the tow path of the canal in the night, from Washington, so as to reach Poolesville by daylight. As he had the countersign and parole, he couPoolesville by daylight. As he had the countersign and parole, he could pass all the pickets. He had fastened his horse and endeavored to reach the storehouse, where he saw light and hoped to get warmth and refreshments but slipped into the lock in crossing. During the stay of the regiment at Muddy Branch, there were numerous changes in the roster. Q. M. S. Oliver F. Briggs, of Company A. was promoted to be Second Lieutenant in that Company: Com. Sergt. Elisha A. Hinks, of Company B. was made Second Lieutenant, Vice Second Lieut. James G. Lurvey, honorabl
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 31: after the battle. (search)
the army, acting as its rear guard, struck across Manassas Plains to Thoroughfare Gap, where it laid three days; then followed up the East side of the Blue Ridge to Edward's Ferry, Md., crossing after nightfall and then camping. During the march from Falmouth to Edward's Ferry there was some insignificant skirmishing with cavalry, mounted troops and light batteries, but nothing of serious moment. Leaving Edward's Ferry early in the morning, after its arrival there, the corps marched by Poolesville and the Monocacy to Frederick City, Md.; thence through Liberty to Uniontown, making a forced march from early dawn until 9 o'clock in the evening. There had been some cavalry skirmishing through the town, and further on, during the day, but the Second Corps were not engaged. On arriving at Uniontown, I received orders to take possession of the town, with the regiment, to preserve order there, picket the exits and prevent the exhibition of any disloyal feeling, especially if it took the
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
Fitzgerald, John, priv., (I), July 6, ‘61; 24; died Nov. 20, ‘61 in camp, Poolesville, Md. Fitzgerald, John, priv., (I), Aug. 3, ‘63; 32; sub. Hiland Hall; transf. Geo. W., wagoner, (D), July 25, ‘61; 37; deserted as priv., June 22, ‘62 at Poolesville. Frost, Hieroninus, priv., (D), July 24, ‘63; 35; sub. Geo. Smith; died Dec Phelps, Elias A., priv., (G), July 25, ‘61; 21; died Oct. 5, ‘61 in camp, Poolesville, Md. Phillips, Eugene C., priv., (K), Aug. 13, ‘61; 20; disch. expir. term, Auemondo, John W., priv., (H), Oct. 25, ‘61; 20; disch. disa. Apr. 24, ‘62 at Poolesville by Major Bates. Restell, John, priv., (H), Dec. 1, ‘61; 41; disch. disa. A; disch. Nov. 22, ‘61 S. O. 139 Headqr's A of P. ‘61 at Camp Benton, near Poolesville, Md. Spofford, Daniel W., priv., (A), Aug. 10, ‘61; 26; wounded Sept. 17, ‘62; olivar, Va. West, Chas., priv., (D), July 25, ‘61; 30; died Apr. 6, ‘62 at Poolesville, Md. West, Chas. E., priv., (K), Mar. 23, ‘64;
............................... 231, 245 Plympton, Amos G.,.................................................. 353 Plympton, Jonathan E., ......1, 2, 5, 7, 152, 181, 192, 201, 258, 260, 262, 271 Po Creek,........................................................... 306 Point Lookout,...................................................... 54 Point of Rocks,...................................................... 52 Poole, Eben D.,.................................................. 330, 348 Poolesville,........................................... 15, 16, 30, 35, 36, 39 Pope, General,........................................................ 122 Porter, James (A),................................................... 187 Porter, James (B),..................................................... 187 Porter, James,........................................................ 106 Porter's Mass. Battery,............................................... 70 Powell, James,......................