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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,193 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 128 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 121 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 68 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 55 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 47 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 2 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 22 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 19 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1. You can also browse the collection for John Newton or search for John Newton in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 15: the battle of Williamsburg (search)
Johnston's line of march he instructed Smith to dislodge our troops. This work Smith directed General Whiting to do. Franklin had put his troops into position as they landed. His flanks were protected by the gunboats, which were at hand, to shell the woods beyond. Each flank rested on swampy creeks running into the river. Besides, he possessed himself, as far as his small force could do so, of the encircling woods. General H. W. Slocum commanded Franklin's left wing, while General John Newton, a loyal Virginian, commanded the right. Whiting, to cover Johnston's army in retreat, bivouacked in a line of battle facing Franklin, but did not attack that evening, as Franklin's troops appeared to be in a position hard to reach. He hoped to attack him as he moved out, but as Franklin did not advance Whiting attacked him furiously in position the next morning, the 7th, at ten o'clock. Franklin, however, in a three hours conflict secured his landing, which was his object, and not, as Joh
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 18: the battle of South Mountain (search)
D. H. Hill's comment, considering his passion, was a compliment, when he said: The Yankees lost on their side General Reno, a renegade Virginian, who was killed by a happy shot from the Twenty-third North Carolina. As Reno was never a secessionist, and as he was always true to the flag of his country, to which several times he swore allegiance, no stretch of language could truthfully brand him as a deserter. He was a true man, like such other Virginians as Craighill, Robert Williams, John Newton, George H. Thomas, and Farragut. The most decisive work was on another front. Hooker was at the head of his corps. McClellan in person gave him orders on the field to press up the old Hagerstown road to the right and make a diversion in aid of Reno's attack. That movement was undertaken without delay. Hooker's corps took on this formation: Meade's division to the right, Hatch's to the left; Ricketts's in the center a little back in reserve. Pleasonton sent two regiments of cava
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 25: the battle of Gettysburg; the second and third day (search)
sh. His brigade was already deployed in the darkness at right angles to the general front, and swept along northward to the right of Krzyzanowski, past the cemetery fence and batteries, and on, on, with marvelous rapidity, sweeping everything before it, till by his energetic help the entire broken front was completely reestablished. General A. S. Webb, a generous and cooperative commander, also sent two of his regiments to my aid. The lines were thus reestablished; then, by the help of General Newton, who commanded the Fifth Corps, I was enabled to shorten my front and have sufficient reserves to prevent the possibility of such a break again. Early made a few desperate attempts to regain what he had just lost. One of his brigade commanders, Colonel Avery, was killed, and his men were falling rapidly, so that he at last gave up the struggle. Every effort against Culp's Hill, on either flank of it, had come too late to be of any avail in Lee's main attack against the Round Tops, a
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 28: Atlanta campaign; battle of Dalton; Resaca begun (search)
nley and T. J. Wood, then present for duty, were men of large experience. A little later General John Newton, who will be recalled for his work at Gettysburg, and in other engagements, both in the Eunfolding of my troops took place; quite a long front appeared-Stanley's division on the right, Newton's on the left, and Wood's in reserve. First, a few cracks of hostile rifles, then an exciting s He did so, and comparative quiet was kept during this strange entertainment. On May 8th General Newton, with my second division, had managed, after working up some two miles north of the gap, to ty, which he deemed too actively talking by the busy use of their flags. Stanley and Wood, on Newton's right, stretched out their own lines to some extent, and gave Newton all the support they coulNewton all the support they could in that difficult ground near the west palisades of the ridge. During the night his men dragged up the steeps two pieces of artillery, and by their help gained another 100 yards of the hotly disput
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 29: battle of Resaca and the Oostanaula (search)
14, 1864, brought to them one of my divisions (Newton's). Newton steadily breasted the Confederatines perfectly and behaved like old soldiers. Newton showed here his wonted tenacity. He secured ad, or he advanced cautiously, so as to support Newton. I came forward and was with him as his mennded in this engagement; Harker and Opdycke of Newton's division were also wounded, but able to remas empty works at Calhoun, continued the march; Newton's division, starting at half-past 5, was followed by Stanley's. Newton took the Adairsville wagon road, while Wood, a little farther to the right,. It was four o'clock in the afternoon when Newton's men, rushing into a grove of trees, brought pid firing just as I was approaching Sherman, Newton and his staff with me. Our group, so large, athat of Colonel Fullerton, my adjutant general; Newton's aid, Captain Jackson, was wounded; two orderhe air slightly wounded Captain Bliss, also of Newton's staff, carrying away the insignia of rank fr[3 more...]
. Soon after the thunder a most abundant deluge of rain followed, which continued falling all through that long night. From 5 P. M. until 6 the attempts to force Hood's line were several times made by Hooker's corps alone. By the latter hour one division of my Fourth corps, moving au cannon, was brought up to Hooker's support. The entire corps through rain and mud was coming forward as fast as it could to Hooker's left, and getting into position as soon as possible; the leading division (Newton's) arrived first, and the rest of the command, somewhat delayed by the mass of Hooker's wagons stretched along the roads, fetched in at last. All that evening and far into the night we assaulted Hood's works again and again; we tried amid the storm to dislodge his troops, but in vain. In the face of sixteen Confederate pieces of artillery using canister and grape, and the musketry of several thousand infantry at close range and delivered, much of it, from behind breastworks, it became simp
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 31: battle of Pickett's Mill (search)
uck them were only trending to the Confederate rear. Wood's men were badly repulsed; he had in a few minutes over 800 killed. While this attack was going on, Newton's and Stanley's divisions of my corps near New Hope Church were attempting to divert attention by a strong demonstration, but the Confederates there behind their , could play with an enfilading fire upon the Confederate works. After some cannonading, seeing the evident intention of a further movement to the rear, I thrust Newton's and Wood's divisions into action early in the day; charging with great vigor, they captured the works in their front, taking about 100 prisoners. Confederaterigade of the enterprising Harker already held the intrenchments which he had captured, and seeing the great advantage of securing them, I hurried in the whole of Newton's division. The situation then was such that Johnston could no longer delay his retrograde movement. Just before Johnston left Muddy Creek, Sherman declared
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 32: battle of Kolb's Farm and Kenesaw (search)
k are selected near the present position of Colonel Grose's brigade. II. General Newton will lead the assault, being prepared to cover his own left. III. Major ll be prepared, with his other two brigades well in hand, to follow closely General Newton's movements. IV. General Wood will occupy his present front and extend tneral Stanley's and Wood's divisions will be pointed out in the morning. General Newton will commence his movement for the attack at sunrise, keeping his troops aser and I, were for hours closeted together. I went with my division commander, Newton, and we examined the ground which our juniors had selected that seemed least objectionable. Newton used the column of regimental divisions, doubled on the center. That formation seemed best for the situation; first, to keep the men concealed aery heavy, particularly in valuable officers. General Harker's brigade, says Newton, advanced through the dense undergrowth, through the slashing and abatis made b
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 33: battle of Smyrna camp ground; crossing the Chattahoochee; General Johnston relieved from command (search)
orks! At three o'clock similar reports came from Wood and Newton. Immediately my corps was assembled. At 5 A. M. it wasineer? Garrard crossed at 6 A. M. with little loss, and Newton, of my corps, followed him during the morning; the ford bd creek, called Rottenwood, that separated him from us. Newton, on the morning of the 9th waited for Dodge to replace him pier log structure, which Stanley made to the island, and Newton finally finished to the east shore. Over Phillip's and Pod, and, staying there, put trenches on Schofield's right; Newton, after his return from Roswell, soon went over to strengthions, Stanley's and Wood's, to the left two miles off from Newton, leaving Newton where he was, on the direct Atlanta wagon Newton where he was, on the direct Atlanta wagon road. This, creating a broad, uncovered space along my front, was done owing to the nature of the country — rough and wooalmost a smile. Fortunately for me, Thomas was to be near Newton's troops during the tough conflict at Peach Tree Creek, wh
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 34: battle of Peach Tree Creek (search)
ime. Thomas, who took his headquarters near Newton's right flank, just back of Peach Tree Creek, ite Schofield's and part of McPherson's. John Newton could never be surprised. He was advancinghat he would deliver battle before many hours, Newton had his bridge over Peach Tree Creek well and ortant knoll off to his right. At one o'clock Newton crossed the bridge and moved forward to the crey had with them. I call this whole formation Newton's cross. Newton was just sending out a frest readiness he could. There first appeared to Newton the front of a Confederate brigade. His own r are always the hardest. Bradley's brigade of Newton's division had long since been faced eastward,were cut down like grass before the scythe, as Newton's men had been at Kenesaw less than a month ben had skirmished up a hill abreast to Ward and Newton, across the Shoal Creek. Geary was in the out fire, combined with all the oblique fire that Newton could bring to bear, broke up the assaulting c[12 more...]