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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 51 51 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 1 1 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 1 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 1 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 1 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 1 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for March, 1866 AD or search for March, 1866 AD in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 59: institutions of the higher grade; the Barry Farm (search)
autiful chapel. The university gives degrees to normal college and theological graduates, and every department has been sedulously kept up to a high standard. Fisk University has, as my officers who gave it aid early predicted, given to Tennessee and, in fact, to other States a steady supply of well-qualified colored teachers. Fisk University has done a noble work. 9. Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute. Having been assured of General S. C. Armstrong's ability and fitness, in March, 1866, I placed him, as we have seen, a subassistant in charge of fourteen counties of eastern Virginia, with his headquarters at Hampton. In 1868 he left the general work for the freedmen and took the presidency of the institute at Hampton, which, in fact, with the American Missionary Association behind him, he founded and steadily developed till his death. Armstrong, from his experience and observation among the natives of Hawaii, insisted on more attention to labor as the basis of his inst