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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 46: negro conditions during the Civil War (search)
with hardly an interruption continued until the spring of 1865. Grant's army in the West occupied Grand Junction, Miss., by November, 186me with the winter months the weather was of great severity. General Grant, with his usual gentleness toward the needy and his fertility ien constituted Chief of Negro Affairs for the entire district under Grant's jurisdiction. The plan which Grant conceived the new superintendGrant conceived the new superintendent ably carried out. There were all around Grand Junction, when our operations opened, large crops of cotton and corn ungathered. It was deand aged, managing to extend to them many unexpected comforts. General Grant in his memoirs suggests this as the first idea of a Freedmen's s quite as large and similarly cared for in the East and South; yet Grant's enterprise afforded an object lesson and had a sensible completeng various Treasury agents and department commanders, including General Grant, and having also the approval of Mr. Lincoln, he issued from Mi
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 47: freedmen's aid societies and an act of congress creating a Bureau of refugees, freedmen and abandoned lands (search)
e inhabitants just emancipated might purchase the land at the expiration of their leases. This sort of legislation, in 1865, was quite new to our Government. It was the exercise of benevolent functions hitherto always contended against by our leading statesmen, even when providing for the Indian Bureau. The Nation, as something to love and cherish and to give forth sympathy and aid to the destitute, began then to be more pronounced than ever before. Our attitude toward the Indians in General Grant's peace policy and in giving them land in severalty; our intervention in Cuba and our subsequent neighborly action toward the people of that island; our national efforts to lift up the people of Porto Rico, and our sending instructors in large numbers to set in motion the work of education in the Philippine Islands: these and other benevolences suggested by this reference make the people of to-day feel that at last we have a Nation which cares for its children. A martinet system always
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 60: opposition to Bureau and reconstruction work became personal; the Congregational Church of Washington (search)
ared that it was believed, a priori, that General Howard would not accept such a present. On seeing such words in print, I had written to friends in Portland and Boston and stated that I agreed with the published statement, but that I earnestly hoped that the contemplated bonds and money would be given to the orphans of our deceased soldiers. In the same manner I had hitherto declined such gifts. Then, turning to Mr. Beecher, I said: Permit me to change my mind about taking presents. Generals Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, and Meade have had theirs. Now I will take mine. It shall be wholly for the house of the Lord! Mr. Beecher, full of happy humor, said: Well, General Howard, you shall have your gift. Then he told the people to pass in their donations. Some $5,000 for our building fund was handed up from the people, in various sums, while Mr. Beecher amused them by his odd and humorous remarks. Something was said or done that night that offended Dr. Boynton. In some way he im
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 61: Court of inquiry; president of Howard University (search)
lling to go to Arizona and New Mexico as a Peace commissioner. General Grant's administration, he said, in pursuance of his peace policy witch could not in the interest of humanity be shut off. Though General Grant himself had sent me to Arizona and New Mexico, endued with extriew with him. I said: General Sheridan, did you never know that General Grant himself sent me to the Southwest to do just what I did! He answered: No, Howard, no 1 did Grant really do that! I replied: Indeed he did, and I never in the whole expedition went beyond my instructionlic journals, and before its receipt by the Speaker, I wrote to Generals Grant and Sherman, and to Secretary Belknap, and demanded a hearing oinquiry of seven army officers of high rank was created by law. General Grant, the President, appointed the court. It first assembled March e judge advocate general upon all the proceedings and findings, General Grant affixed his approval July 2, 1874. It lacked but one day of fo
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 63: in the Northwest, among the Indians; trip to Alaska; life in Portland, Ore.; 1874 to 1881 (search)
as while I was stationed at this post and occupying these new quarters that General Grant with some of his family and friends, returning from his visit around the woom the territory of Washington and the State of Oregon to meet him. When General Grant and his wife rode up with me from the Vancouver dock to my quarters, he hadoad till I can manage to say a few words. Everybody, including General and Mrs. Grant, gave Mrs. Howard special credit for the cheerful, simple, and satisfactory eortland — going down the Columbia and up the Willamette. One instance showed Grant's humor. He and his wife were standing near the gunwale as we approached the cncluding the roofs, and the docks were thronged with people. Noticing them General Grant said to his wife: Julia, look there; see those people. This turn-out must thered in a large room of observation, just in front of the lofty pilot house. Grant and most of the company were smoking, while he told incidents of his journey ar
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 69: transferred to New York city (search)
in Tennessee, is full of bright sunshine in retrospect.. I enjoyed making a thorough study of Taylor's career, going to every place where history said he had been, and taking a trip to Old Mexico to see his battlefields. On this agreeable visit I was accompanied by Captain and Mrs. Guy Howard, Captain and Mrs. Charles R. Barnett, Mrs. Shoemaker and daughter, of Baltimore, and Mrs. Barnett's mother and sister. Before starting, the Mexican Minister Romero, who so generously befriended General Grant in New York, gave me letters to the President of the Mexican Republic and to others. Their kindness met me as soon as I crossed the border. At Camargo the commandant had his battalion under arms to do me honor at ten o'clock at night. The same thing occurred later, on our arrival at Matamoras. As soon as I reached the City of Mexico, an officer of rank, designated by President Diaz, met us at the station and showed our party every attention during our stay at the capital. I enjoyed
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 70: D. L. Moody on board the Spree; Spanish War, 1898; Lincoln Memorial University; conclusion (search)
dy for unveiling. The procession was large, and General Grenville M. Dodge was made the grand marshal for the occasion. I was selected to command the veteran division and so located as to review all the troops as they passed on northward toward Grant's Tomb. I sat with my staff for over four hours reviewing the parade. My station was in the vicinity of Seventieth Street, with my back toward the river. There was nothing very remarkable except the excessive coldness of the weather, which cou proclamation of the truth as we saw it. We went on down from Key West to Guantanimo and there met our fleet under the command of Admiral Sampson. He very kindly sent me on a little steamer, the Vixen, commanded by Captain Sharp (a nephew of General Grant), to Santiago de Cuba. I next passed after arrival to the transport steamer Comal, which was fastened to the dock in the inner harbor. From this ship I had a clear view of many streets of Santiago. Here I saw crowds of Cubans, wretched, im