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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 163 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 151 13 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 128 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 62 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 57 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 55 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 49 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 40 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Jacksonville (Florida, United States) or search for Jacksonville (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 48: organization of the freedmen's Bureau and my principles of action (search)
believed to ten assistant commissioners; I could increase the number provided they were army officers detailed for the work; in fact, thus far, every one had been assigned, by my asking, from the army. September 19th I announced three more assistant commissioners: General Davis Tillson, Georgia, Headquarters, Augusta. General Wager Swayne, Alabama, Headquarters, Montgomery. General E. M. Gregory, Texas, Headquarters, Galveston. Osborn was changed to Florida with headquarters at Jacksonville; Saxton was still the assistant commissioner for South Carolina and Georgia, General Tillson being regarded at first as an acting assistant commissioner, reporting to Saxton. From these State centers were organized subdistricts, more or less in number according to the needs. There were a few civil employees, but generally the subagents (called by some officers assistant superintendents) for given districts, were put on duty directly by the Secretary of War, being taken and sent to the
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 59: institutions of the higher grade; the Barry Farm (search)
s. I remember well its beginning and followed it with much sympathy and aid. 18. The Swayne School, and also the Emerson School at Montgomery, Ala., not now found in the United States school reports, were absorbed in the newer State Normal School for Colored Students, which gives an aggregate enrollment for 1903 of 416 pupils and 20 teachers. General Swayne, my diligent and able assistant commissioner, aided these schools in every possible way. 19. The Stanton Normal School, of Jacksonville, Fla., began January, 1868. A good building was dedicated April 10, 1869. General G. W. Gile, subassistant commissioner, sent me that day from Florida this dispatch: The Stanton Normal Institute is being dedicated. Thousands assembled send their greeting to you as their truest advocate. That year this Normal had 348 pupils and 6 instructors. 20. Shaw University in Raleigh, N. C., had its inception in 1865 in the work and enterprise of Rev. Dr. H. M. Tupper (who was an enlisted Christi
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 70: D. L. Moody on board the Spree; Spanish War, 1898; Lincoln Memorial University; conclusion (search)
he Master as best we could. We met early in May and took counsel together. From the American Tract Society we obtained important booklets, Cromwell's Bible, and other publications for distribution. The religious newspapers, especially the Christian Herald, aided us with weekly papers. From other sources we obtained dailies in abundance. After we had laid in an ample supply for the camps then existing, for example, Camp Alger in Virginia, Camp Thomas at Chickamauga, the encampments at Jacksonville and Tampa, Fla., and Mobile, Ala., we went together first to Camp Alger. At each camp we found that our young men had already given and pitched a large tent called The Pavilion. It was well supplied with tables, chairs, and desks. Plenty of headed paper with envelopes was provided for the soldiers. Here was piled up for their use abundance of books and booklets. A young man well selected by the Y. M. C. A., sometimes with one or two assistants, was attending to all the wants of the