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The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations 10 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 14: the minister's wooing, 1857-1859. (search)
own to it. A moral aim is a fine thing, but in making a story an artist is a traitor who does not sacrifice everything to art. Remember the lesson that Christ gave us twice over. First, he preferred the useless Mary to the dish-washing Martha, and next, when that exemplary moralist and friend of humanity, Judas, objected to the sinful waste of the Magdalen's ointment, the great Teacher would rather it should be wasted in an act of simple beauty than utilized for the benefit of the poor. Cleopatra was an artist when she dissolved her biggest pearl to captivate her Antonypublic. May I, a critic by profession, say the whole truth to a woman of genius? Yes? And never be forgiven? I shall try, and try to be forgiven, too. In the first place, pay no regard to the advice of anybody. In the second place, pay a great deal to mine! A Kilkenny-cattish style of advice? Not at all. My advice is to follow your own instincts,--to stick to nature, and to avoid what people commonly call the I