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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 49 3 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 30 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 26 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 14 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. You can also browse the collection for Marseilles (France) or search for Marseilles (France) in all documents.

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pter 13: old scenes revisited, 1856. En route to Rome. trials of travel. a midnight arrival and an inhospitable reception. glories of the eternal city. Naples and Vesuvius. Venice. Holy week in Rome. return to England. letter from Harriet Martineau on Dred. a word from Mr. Prescott on Dred. farewell to Lady Byron. After leaving Paris Mrs. Stowe and her sister, Mrs. Perkins, traveled leisurely through the South of France toward Italy, stopping at Amiens, Lyons, and Marseilles. At this place they took steamer for Genoa, Leghorn, and Civita Vecchia. During their last night on shipboard they met with an accident, of which, and their subsequent trials in reaching Rome, Mrs. Stowe writes as follows-- About eleven o'clock, as I had just tranquilly laid down in my berth, I was roused by a grating crash, accompanied by a shock that shook the whole ship, and followed by the sound of a general rush on deck, trampling, scuffling, and cries. I rushed to the door an