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agreed upon as the only remedy that would meet the exigency of the hour. Preston S. Brooks, a Representative from South Carolina, either volunteered or was selected as the agent for its infliction. After the adjournment of the Senate on the 22d of May, Mr. Sumner remained at his desk engaged in writing. While so engaged, Brooks, whom he did not know, approached him and said: I have read your speech twice over, carefully. It is a libel on South Carolina and Mr. Butler, who is a relative of were very much lost sight of in the moral and political significance of the act. For the moment Sumner and Brooks were regarded mainly as representative men, exponents of the two civilizations which divided the country, while the scenes on the 22d of May on the floor of the Senate were looked upon as typical of what was being enacted on the wider theatre of the nation. Mr. Sumner, though confessedly the superior of his assailant in stature and physical strength, sitting and cramped beneath his
agreed upon as the only remedy that would meet the exigency of the hour. Preston S. Brooks, a Representative from South Carolina, either volunteered or was selected as the agent for its infliction. After the adjournment of the Senate on the 22d of May, Mr. Sumner remained at his desk engaged in writing. While so engaged, Brooks, whom he did not know, approached him and said: I have read your speech twice over, carefully. It is a libel on South Carolina and Mr. Butler, who is a relative of were very much lost sight of in the moral and political significance of the act. For the moment Sumner and Brooks were regarded mainly as representative men, exponents of the two civilizations which divided the country, while the scenes on the 22d of May on the floor of the Senate were looked upon as typical of what was being enacted on the wider theatre of the nation. Mr. Sumner, though confessedly the superior of his assailant in stature and physical strength, sitting and cramped beneath his
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Sixth: the interval of illness and repose. (search)
Physician to the Queen, advised him strongly against any early return to public life. But so deep was his anxiety about certain measures before Congress, he could not be deterred from returning; and in December, 1857, he was once more in his seat. But he soon found that application to public affairs brought on a recurrence of his unfavorable symptoms, and a series of relapses induced him at last to make one more, and, if necessary, a protracted effort for recovery. Consequently, on the 22d of May, the following year,—1858,—he once more embarked for Europe. At Paris he placed himself under the care of Dr. Brown-Sequard, the illustrious physiologist and specialist, who made a more thorough and analytical diagnosis of his case than had ever been made; and he unreservedly expressed the opinion that the blows on the head had taken effect by contre-coups in the spine, producing disturbance in the spinal cord. What then shall be the remedy? inquired Mr. Sumner. Fire, answered Dr. Bro
Physician to the Queen, advised him strongly against any early return to public life. But so deep was his anxiety about certain measures before Congress, he could not be deterred from returning; and in December, 1857, he was once more in his seat. But he soon found that application to public affairs brought on a recurrence of his unfavorable symptoms, and a series of relapses induced him at last to make one more, and, if necessary, a protracted effort for recovery. Consequently, on the 22d of May, the following year,—1858,—he once more embarked for Europe. At Paris he placed himself under the care of Dr. Brown-Sequard, the illustrious physiologist and specialist, who made a more thorough and analytical diagnosis of his case than had ever been made; and he unreservedly expressed the opinion that the blows on the head had taken effect by contre-coups in the spine, producing disturbance in the spinal cord. What then shall be the remedy? inquired Mr. Sumner. Fire, answered Dr. Bro