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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 744 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 56 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 40 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 37 3 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 37 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 5 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman). You can also browse the collection for Louis Agassiz or search for Louis Agassiz in all documents.

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y, the great botanist, came to Cambridge, and his coming marks an epoch in the scientific life of our city. In 1847, Louis Agassiz, Asa Gray, Jeffries Wyman, and Professor Horsford formed the nucleus of a school of science, which has had more inflca than any other scientific institution. A large number of young naturalists hastened to work under the inspiration of Agassiz, and Cambridge immediately became the centre on this continent of zoological research. The presence of this great man iole life pleaded. He still lives in his works and in his trees. Then, too, there was a distinguished contemporary of Agassiz and Gray, a man so modest that Cambridge did not know it possessed a great man until he died,—Jeffries Wyman. The studey is the proper environment of such men. In 1850, the Scientific School was established, and under the instruction of Agassiz, Gray, Wyman, Peirce, Eustis, Horsford, a number of teachers were bred who, I have said, have extended the spirit of res
h the grounds, called Indian Ridge, is the sarcophagus of Gaspar Spurzheim, the celebrated phrenologist; he died in 1832. Farther on is that of the poet Longfellow, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the printer, the phil
selection were married. It was determined to choose three more married ladies and thus complete the number of seven. They were, in the order of coming into the scheme, Mrs. Gilman, Mrs. Greenough, Miss Longfellow, Miss Horsford, Mrs. Cooke, Mrs. Agassiz, and Mrs. Gurney. This bare statement of the first steps in the organization gives no intimation of the long consideration that had been devoted to the subject by Mr. and Mrs. Gilman, of the hesitation with which the presentation of the mar friendly offices. Information as to the qualifications required, with the names of the Instructors in any branch, may be obtained upon application to any one of the ladies, or to their Secretary, Mr. Arthur Gilman, 5 Phillips Place. Mrs. Louis AgassizQuincy Street. Mrs. E. W. GurneyFayerweather Street. Mrs. J. P. CookeQuincy Street. Mrs. J. B. GreenoughAppian Way. Mrs. Arthur GilmanPhillips Place. Miss Alice M. LongfellowBrattle Street. Miss Lilian HorsfordCraigie Street. Cambr
ich, previous to 1861, was the Otis,—the school which, from 1843 to 1847, was known as the High and Grammar School of East Cambridge; or like the Washington, whose history, as we have seen, makes it difficult to assign a satisfactory date for its founding. The Morse and Wellington schools have primary in addition to the grammar grades. In addition to these ten grammar schools mentioned there are three others that contain grammar pupils to the number of 388 (December, 1895),—the Corlett, Agassiz, and Sleeper. These schools send their pupils of the upper grades to such of the other grammar schools as are in their vicinity. With the exception of the Corlett, the same schools have primary as well as grammar grades. The Wellington School is a training school for teachers. There had previously been a training school from 1870 to 1882. An interval of two years without such a school brought into bold relief its value to the city. Consequently, in 1884, the present school was organ
particularly to the need of each individual pupil. Professor Agassiz's School. The mind reverts at once, when the subjethe lecturing tours which were not only a great fatigue to Agassiz, but an interruption also to all consecutive scientific woese plans were partly matured before they were confided to Agassiz himself. When the domestic conspirators revealed their pl illustrated by specimens, models, maps, and drawings. Louis Agassiz, His Life and Correspondence. Edited by Elizabeth Cary r difficult they might be. Life, Letters, and Works of Louis Agassiz, by Jules Marcou. New York and London, 1896, II. pp. 60, 61. Mrs. Agassiz says that Mr. Agassiz never had an audience more responsive than the sixty or seventy girls who gathMr. Agassiz never had an audience more responsive than the sixty or seventy girls who gathered every day at the close of the morning to hear his daily lecture; nor did he ever give to any audience lectures more careve you are useful only, or chiefly, for this object. . . . Agassiz had the cooperation not only of his brother-in-law, Profes
General Index. Abbot, Ezra, 68. Agassiz, Louis, excites the spirit of research, 74; his school for young ladies, 74, 209-211; his personality, 74. Agassiz, Mrs. Louis, plans her husband's school, 200; president of Radcliffe College, 180. Aldermen, 401. Allston, Washington, 41. Allston Street, fort at foot of, 2Agassiz, Mrs. Louis, plans her husband's school, 200; president of Radcliffe College, 180. Aldermen, 401. Allston, Washington, 41. Allston Street, fort at foot of, 27. Almshouses, 17, 32, 276. American Lodge, K. of P., 292. Amicable Lodge of Masons, 280-283. Amity Rebekah Lodge, 286. Andover, college library and apparatus moved to, 26. Anniversary committees, 406-408. Appleton, Rev. Nathaniel, 236; the Revolution the great event in his ministry, 237; church lands sold in hsident Dunster and Edward Goffe, 188. Schoolmaster's salary in 1680, 10. Schools in 1800, 33; in 1845, 33. Schools, graded, 33. Schools, private: Professor Agassiz's, 209-211; Joshua Kendall's, 211, 212; Berkeley Street School, 212; Browne and Nichols, 212-214; Cambridge School for Girls, 214-217; FittingSchool for Boys