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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 85 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 56 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 37 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 30 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 26 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 6 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for David Lee Child or search for David Lee Child in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 6 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
any with his wife, on September 24, 1835, he spent the following day in Providence, and reached Boston at noon on the 26th. He found there this greeting from David Lee Child, written at New York on the 23d: Be of good cheer. The Devil comes not out without much Ms. tearing and rending and foaming at the mouth. With all my coom he only escaped by accepting Ms. Aug. 7, 1835, Henry to G. W. Benson. the escort of ladies. A similar experience, in Julien Hall, is related on p. 248 of Mrs. Child's Letters, a plot to kidnap Mr. Thompson being foiled by a stratagem of the ladies present. See, also, p. 1 of Boston Commonwealth, Oct. 23, 1880. Unable to remain in New York, whither on the 12th he accompanied Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Child despite the remonstrances of his friends, his first test of the New England temper after the signal had been given from Faneuil Hall proved how much it had changed for the worse towards himself. The attack on him at Concord (N. H.), on September 4, fol
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
ebtedness was general. As for his impulse to write at all, Dr. Channing told Mrs. Child in 1833 that the reading of her Appeal had aroused his Mrs. Child's LettersMrs. Child's Letters, p. 48. conscience to the query whether he ought to remain silent on the subject. Mr. Garrison's direct private exhortation early in the following year must have keovember, 1835 ( Life of W. E. Channing, Centenary Memorial edition, p. 537). Mrs. Child, in an open letter to him, written after she had read his essay, declared: Haak up till about 11 o'clock. Prof. Follen and wife, Ellis G. Loring and wife, Mrs. Child, Miss Ammidon, the Westons, Miss Chapman, Mr. Sewall, Mr. Southwick, Mr. Knapmball, Mr. Fairbanks, &c., were present. Mrs.John S. Kimball. Drury Fairbanks. Child looks in remarkably good health, and made some remarks at the ladies' meeting ousiness. Last evening I was at Miss S.'s, in company Sunday, April 17. with Mrs. Child and several other friends, and had a very agreeable visit. Miss S. is a most
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
they will be compelled to take sides. As our object is universal emancipation,—to redeem woman as well as man from a servile to an equal condition,—we shall go for the rights of woman to their utmost extent. Such was the first outcome of Mr. Garrison's Perfectionism, whose agreement, be it more or less—or not at all—with Noyes's, it is needless to discuss here. Perfectionism is a dark subject, and attempts to throw light upon it may easily end in leaving it more obscure than ever. Mrs. Child, for example, wrote to her brother, December 22, 1838: Something is coming toward us (I know not what), with Letters, p. 33. a glory round its head, and its long luminous rays are even now glancing on the desert and the rock. The Unitarian, busily at work pulling down old structures, suddenly sees it gild some ancient pillar, or shed its soft light on some mossgrown altar; and he stops with a troubled doubt whether all is to be destroyed; and if destroyed, wherewith shall he build a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
ruments above alluded to, non-resistance is more explicitly enjoined upon abolitionists than the duty of using the elective franchise. So thought and wrote David Lee Child, in a masterly letter designed to be read at the American anniversary: For myself, I have never been able to conceive of any principle on which slaves can be d for political electioneering (Lib. 9: 86). Considering the attempt to deduce a particular form of political influence from the general profession on that head, Mr. Child asked, Would any one prescribe the way in which to encourage the religious improvement of the people of color, also enjoined by the Constitution? Joshua Leavitts of their numbers, whence their moral strength would come to seem equally contemptible, and defeat at the polls would discourage all effort in other ways. David Lee Child, in the letter cited above (p. 304), said: We have got ourselves prematurely counted. Heretofore, the numbers of the abolitionists being measured by the good
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
American Society but to resolve, on Lib. 10.82. motion of Mr. Loring, to establish a new organ. One other resolution, or series of resolutions, offered by David Lee Child on behalf of the business committee, still calls for notice: Resolved, That the American Anti-Slavery Society regard Lib. 10.82. with heartfelt interesolitionists, white and black, but a large proportion of women— Harriet Martineau, a life-member of the Massachusetts Society; Mrs. Phillips and Mrs. Chapman and Mrs. Child, as well as their respective husbands; Miss Abby Kelley, Miss Emily Winslow, and still others. The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society, unabashed by Sturg up to the time when the abolition of slavery made it needless. Various friends contributed to sustain it editorially, till, some time in 1841, Mrs. [Lydia Maria] Child was appointed editor by the Exec. Com.(not Mr. C., who was never editor, although I obtained and paid for his services as a reporter, at Washington, for a short t
, 360.—Letter to G., 2.1. Child, Isaac, 1.278. Child, Lydia Maria [b. Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; d. Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880], nee Francis, married D. L. Child, 1.73; religious views censured by G., 157; talks about G. during his imprisonment, 229; first meeting and its effect, 1.418, 2.90; her Appeal, 1.418, 2.90, and85; N. B. Borden, 2.311; G. Bourne, 2.238; A. Buffum, 1.290, 319, 322, 326, 327, 429, 430; C. C. Burleigh, 2.51; T. F. Buxton, 1.369; M. W. Chapman, 2.224, 240; D. L. Child, 2.1; J. A. Collins, 2.414; A. L. Cox, 1.433; P. Crandall, 1.315, 316, 322; J. Cropper, 1.444; L. Crowl, 2.315; C. Cushing, 2.330; E. M. Davis, 2.211; S. Fessenainst sectarian control of Am. A. S. S., 344. Massachusetts Colonization Society, formed, 1.261, demise, 474. Massachusetts Journal and Tribune, edited by D. L. Child, 1.73, 229. Mathew, Theobald, Rev. [1790-1856], 2.380. Maxwell, Capt., 1.344. May, Joseph, Col., 1.213, 217. Brother of May, Samuel [b. Boston, Dec. 4,