hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 177 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 102 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 83 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 68 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 60 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 60 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 56 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 32 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 27 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for James Russell Lowell or search for James Russell Lowell in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
two vehicles came so close together as to brush off the rioters from one side. This relief enabled the horses to get a headway, and they went off at a gallop (Woman's Journal, Oct. 26, 1878, p. 340). To reach the jail by a direct course was found impracticable; and after going in a circuitous direction, At Bowdoin Square, the driver made as if going for Cambridge bridge, and this shook off a number of the pursuers ( Garrison Mob, p. 23). and encountering many hair-breadth 'scapes, Lowell Mason, Jr., was on Leverett Street, about half way down, when the carriage dashed past. The pursuit was even then so determined that the mob jumped upon the steps and were thrust away by the constable within. Boy that he was, young Mason was struck by the composure of Mr. Garrison's countenance. The mob, he remembers, was not a rough one, in the present sense of that term: it was composed of young men (merchants' clerks, as Mr. Ellis Ames describes them). Mr. Mason's observation should be
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
as, in all next month. What a hazardous project! This trip was abandoned by both parties. In August, Lundy began in Philadelphia a new weekly, the National Enquirer, and resumed the monthly publication of his Genius ( Life, p. 289; Lib. 6.131). But to return to the meeting: as we are disappointed in getting a meeting-house or hall in which to hold the N. E. Convention, except our own little hall at 46, we discussed the expediency of having the Convention held either in Providence or Lowell. Mr. Kimball proposed that we should hire a vacant lot of ground in this city, and erect upon it a large shanty, capable of holding two or three thousand people—saying that he would give $25 towards it. It was generally thought, however, that, if erected, it would be torn down before we could occupy it, and would be likely to excite a mob without doing us any benefit, as the market is now getting to be somewhat glutted with deeds of violence. For several good reasons, we have concluded, if
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
of his visit to Brooklyn with a great deal Rev. S. J. May. of pleasure. He will be at the Sabbath Convention. . . . No adequate report of the Convention was ever made. It met at the Chardon-Street Chapel on November 17, Lib. 10.190. 1840, and sat for three days, without arriving at any conclusion or adopting any resolutions. The roll of members embraced, besides the persons already enumerated, Francis Jackson, Henry G. Chapman, Samuel Philbrick, William Adams, Andrew Robeson, James Russell Lowell, George Ripley, C. P. Cranch, and not a few ladies. Among the interested but passive spectators Lib. 10.194. Weiss's Life of Parker, 1.158. were Dr. Channing, who, as Theodore Parker reports, doubted the propriety of the Convention, since it looks like seeking agitation, and [he] fears the opinion of Garrison, Quincy, and Maria W. Chapman; and R. W. Emerson, who has left the best—indeed, an ideal— summary view of the Convention in its three stages. Emerson's Lectures and Biographi
G., 192; invokes the law against him, 246; some manliness, 521; praise from J. R. Lowell, 246.—Letters to F. Jackson, 2.7; from G., 1.179. Buffum, Arnold [b. Smitm of L. Lovejoy, J. C., 1.195. Lowell (Mass.), Thompson mob, 1.452, 453. Lowell, James Russell [b. Cambridge, Mass., Feb. 22, 1819], poem to G., 1.245, praise , 382; poem to W. Phillips, 2.129; at Chardon St. Convention, 424. Grandson of Lowell, John [1743-1802], 1.271. Lucas & Deaver, 1.142. Lumpkin, Wilson [1783-18ti-Slavery societies, 89, 159. Mason, Jeremiah [1768-1848], 1.214. Mason, Lowell [1792-1872], 1.126. Mason, Lowell, Jr. [b. 1823], 2.27. Massachusetts, clLowell, Jr. [b. 1823], 2.27. Massachusetts, claim, 1.60-62, 71; law against mixed marriages, 254, 255, 2.434; no heed to Southern appeals, 76; fate of colored seamen in Southern ports, 79, 104, 434; debates on a Genius of Temperance, suspension, 124. Neal, John [1793-1876], described by Lowell, 1.382; Blackwood article on American writers, 57, 384; on G.'s retirement from