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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 44 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 32 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Unitarian or search for Unitarian in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
Garrison's settled policy to provoke Lib. 5.184, 185. mobs as much as he can, and so identify his cause with the cause of civil liberty, to the distress of worthy citizens thus forced to choose between him and the mob. The Christian Register (Unitarian) saw no adequate Right and Wrong, 1836, (1) p. 63. excuse for a mob in the meeting of a few black and white ladies, in an hour of romance or revery, but rebuked them and their male associates for courting persecution. As the friends of peacee to Dr. Channing's book. You have doubtless seen it before this, and very likely have begun to dissect it and to set Dr. C. over against Dr. C. Be this as it may, I hope you will take it in hand and give it a thorough review. Some of our good Unitarian friends, I think, are biassed in their judgment of it by their partialities for the Dr. They need to see the Dr. tested by an impartial and unbiassed pen. And I have another reason for saying the Dr. should be thus reviewed. On my return I cal
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
common panegyric. Among the speakers were Rev. Mr. Norris, Methodist; Isaac Samuel Norris. R. B. Hall. Alanson St. Clair. S. J. May. Henry B. Stanton. George W. Benson. Winslow, Friend; Rev. Mr. Hall, Congregationalist; Rev. Mr. St. Clair, Unitarian, etc., etc. Amasa Walker said that the success of the Liberator was identified with that of the cause. Even now the enemy was exultant because the Liberator was languishing for want of support. It ought to be adopted as the centre, the org subject of slavery. In the same number of the Liberator, the editor had the gratification of publishing the accession to the cause of a man whose services to it were destined far to outweigh those of any clerical critic, whether Orthodox or Unitarian. It would be hard to say—happily, it is needless to decide—whether Wendell Phillips or Edmund Quincy showed the greater self-abnegation, the greater integrity of mind and moral independence, in quitting his fashionable, respectable, Bostonian
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
not who is found upon this broad platform of our common nature: if he will join hands with us, in good faith, to undo the heavy burdens and break the yokes of our enslaved countrymen, we shall not stop to inquire whether he is a Trinitarian or Unitarian, Baptist or Methodist, Catholic or Covenanter, Presbyterian or Quaker, Swedenborgian or Perfectionist. However widely we may differ in our views on other subjects, we shall not refuse to labor with him against slavery, in the same phalanx, if to be made a touchstone in other fields of reform—in that of peace, for example. This delightful yet awfully Lib. 8.27. momentous subject, as Mr. Garrison styled it, had been popularized in Boston in a series of weekly lectures by prominent Unitarian clergymen at the Odeon—the redeemed Federal-Street Theatre. Henry Ware, Jr., began the course in January; Dr. Channing and Samuel Lib. 8.15, 27. J. May followed in February. In April, the New York Peace Society issued a call for a representa
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
never again to be so near without seeing them. In the stage which brought me home, I found Bro. Whiting, Nathaniel H. Whiting, appointed to lecture in the Old Colony (Lib. 9.66). and from him I learnt that you had returned to Boston. And on my desk I found two letters inviting me to meet you at Plymouth. Since then I have seen several Plymouth people, and from all have learnt that the effect of your lectures and conversations there was excellent. Bro. Briggs George Ware Briggs, Unitarian clergyman at Plymouth. has become deeply interested in the cause. Robert B. Hall's wisdom seems to be turned away backwards. As early as July, 1837, it was apparent that Mr. Hall's clericalism had got the better of his abolitionism. On the 23d of that month, he refused to read a notice of an anti-slavery lecture, by A. A. Phelps, from the pulpit he was temporarily occupying in Cambridgeport, Mass., on the ground that the regular pastor had refused to do the same (Lib. 7.123). This si
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
y likeness —a copy of which has been spoken for by the Duchess aforesaid. (Don't you be jealous!) I have seen Lady Byron repeatedly, and the day before yesterday took dinner and tea with her at July 1, 1840. the house of Mrs. Reid, an opulent Unitarian lady. Dined at E. Reid's with Lady Byron, writes Mrs. Mott in her diary. Wm. L. Garrison, N. P. Rogers, Remond, Dr. Hutton and wife, and many others to tea. Much conversation on housekeeping, neglect of families, and woman's proper sphere: a very pleasant visit ( Life of J. And L. Mott, p. 164). Dr. Hutton was the principal Unitarian clergyman of London ( Memorial of G. Bradburn, pp. 109-111). Elizabeth J. Reid. I would just add, that our colored friend Remond invariably C. L. Remond. accompanies us, and is a great favorite in every circle. Surely, if dukes, lords, duchesses, and the like, are not ashamed to eat, sit, walk and talk with colored Americans, the democrats of our country need not deem it a vulgar or odious thing
1.456; harsh language censured, 457, and defended, 458; attempted Unitarian censorship, 462, 463; appeal to Dr. Channing, 1.464, 2.90; sonnetn, Mass., Mar. 7, 1789; d. Boston, Nov. 14, 1861], career, 1.454; Unitarian, 2.138; catechizes A. Lawrence, 1.455, 2.246; at Free Church meetn in 1834, 432; change of office, 433; Refuge of Oppression, 453; Unitarian censorship proposed, 462, 463; office in danger of mob, 386, 491;, April 14, 1803; d.. May 24, 1858], lawyer, 1.273, career, 2.55; Unitarian, 138; aid to Liberator, 1.224; part in founding New Eng. A. S. SoBoston, Mass., Sept. 12, 1797; d. Syracuse, N. Y., July 1, 1871], Unitarian, 2.38; nephew of S. May, 1.495; career, 213; founds a Peace Soc.,n with Thompson, 451, 452; literary style, 461; A. S. labors with Unitarian clergy, 463; on Channing's riot sermon, 466; labors with ChanningSewall, Samuel Edmund [b. Boston, Nov. 9, 1799], ancestry, 1.213; Unitarian, 2.138; attends G.'s Julien Hall and Athenaeum lectures, 1.213, 2