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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 22 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 18 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Matthew Arnold or search for Matthew Arnold in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
n Philadelphia, 16 February, 1848. They all emphasize the love story of Rolfe and Pocahontas and make John Smith a central character. Mrs. Conner alone takes Pocahontas to England, where she dies. Of the colonial dramas, Barker's Superstition (1824) and R. P. Smith's William Penn (1829) seem the most significant. As was natural, the Revolution was the most appealing theme. Practically every great event from the Boston Tea Party to the Battle of Yorktown was dramatized. The treason of Arnold and Andre's capture was a favourite theme and it is to our credit that Andre usually is a heroic figure. See Matthews, Brander, Int. to his reprint of Andre in Dunlap Soc. Pub., Ser. I, No. 4, 1887. Marion and Franklin were also favourites, but everyone else runs a bad second to Washington so far as the stage is concerned. One of the most interesting scenes occurs in Blanche of Brandywine (1858) by J. G. Burnett, in which Howe deliberately puts himself in Washington's power in order, ap
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
armion; it was barely completed with Sigurd the Volsung of William Morris; it included the lives of Byron and Shelley and most that was best in those of Tennyson, Arnold, Browning. It began the year following Joel Barlow's American epic The Columbiad, and the publication of The Echo by the Hartford Wits. Longfellow and Whittier n for version, it will be found to be the better translation, from the point of view of limpid and consequent story-telling-perhaps the best in English verse. Of Arnold's four Homeric characteristics, rapidity of movement, plainness of style, simplicity of ideas, nobility of manner, Bryant's translation is inadequate mainly in th. And if he was and is a true poet, he belongs to our best traditions also as critic. He was never, to be sure, the professional guide of literary taste, like Arnold and Lowell. Apart from sensible but obvious memorial addresses on Irving, Halleck, and Cooper, his best known essay is introductory to his Library of poetry and
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: Emerson (search)
eous sentiment showed itself with Emerson not in that fluency which in many of his contemporaries meant mere longwindedness, but in the habit of waiting for the momentary inspiration to the neglect of meditated construction and regularity. He has indeed succeeded in sustaining himself to the end in three or four poems of some compass, but his noblest work in verse must be sought in those quatrains which need no context for their comprehension and might be called spiritual ejaculations. Matthew Arnold has quoted for approval the two familiar stanzas, So nigh is grandeur to our dust, So near is God to man, When Duty whispers low, Thou must, The youth replies, I can. and, Though love repine and reason chafe, There came a voice without reply: 'Tis man's perdition to be safe, When for the truth he ought to die. These quatrains are, he says, exceptional in Emerson. They are that, and something more: they are exceptional in literature. One would have to search far to find anything in Eng
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
iad, the, 172, 174 Anderson, J. S. M., 20 Andre, Major, 225 Andre, 219, 225 n. Androborus, 215, 215 n. Andros, Sir, Edmund, 52 Annals of Quodlibet, the, 312 Anti-Jacobin, the, 171, 176 Apology for the true Christian divinity (Barclay), I 16 Appeal from the judgments of great Britain respecting the United States, an, 208 Aquinas, Thomas, 266 Arbuthnot, John, I16 Argus, 236 Aristocracy, 175 Armand, or the child of the people, 230 Arnold, Benedict, 225 Arnold, Matthew, 261, 273, 276, 358 Art of thinking, 93 Arthur Mervyn, 288, 290 Articles of Confederation, 145 Ashe, Thomas, 190, 191, 206, 213 Association, The (1775), 135, 136 Astor, John Jacob, 194, 209, 210 Astoria, 194, 209, 210 Asylum, the, 292 Atala, 212 Audubon, 189 Aurelian, 324 Autobiography (David Crockett), 319 Autobiography (Franklin), 91, 94 n., 161 Autumnal reflections, 238 B Backwoodsman, the, 238-239, 279 Bacon, Lord, 82, I 10, I 16 Bacon