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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 333 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 182 182 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 131 131 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 39 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 33 33 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 22 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 21 21 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for 1869 AD or search for 1869 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Introduction. (search)
sense wherein all miracle is true. During her stay in New York, as editor of the Anti-slavery standard, she found a pleasant home at the residence of the genial philanthropist, Isaac T. Hopper, whose remarkable life she afterwards wrote. Her portrayal of this extraordinary man, so brave, so humorous, so tender and faithful to his convictions of duty, is one of the most readable pieces of biography in English literature. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, in a discriminating paper published in 1869, speaks of her eight years sojourn in New York as the most interesting and satisfactory period of her whole life. She was placed where her sympathetic nature found abundant outlet and occupation. Dwelling in a house where disinterestedness and noble labor were as daily breath, she had great opportunities. There was no mere alms-giving; but sin and sorrow must be brought home to the fireside and the heart; the fugitive slave, the drunkard, the outcast woman, must be the chosen guests of the
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Rev. Samuel J. May. (search)
To Rev. Samuel J. May. Wayland, 1867. Your anti-slavery sketches >Some Recollections of our Anti-Slavery Conflict, by Samuel J. May. Boston, 1869. At the time this letter was written, however, they were appearing in regular installments in the Christian Register of Boston. carry me back pleasantly to those bygone days when our souls were raised above the level of common life by the glorious inspiration of unselfish zeal. It seems but a little while ago, and yet men speak of it as a dead subject, so swiftly the world whirls round, carrying us, and all memory of us, with it! In your very kind notice of me, you have exaggerated some things, and omitted others. I don't think I lost so much per annum by espousing the antislavery cause. At all events, I think the indefinite statement that my literary prospects were much injured by it would have been better. With regard to society, I was a gainer decidedly; for though the respectables, who had condescended to patronize me, f
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1869. The music-box arrived safely, and I thank you from my inmost heart for thinking of your old friend, and wishing to give her pleasure. The old music-box is very dear to me. Its powers are limited, but what it does say it says very sweetly; and the memories it sings to me are the dearest of all .... We had quite a glorification here over Grant's election. We had a really handsome procession of five hundred men bearing flags and gay-colored lanterns, and attended by a band of music from Boston. I had no idea they would come up so far as our house; but as we had subscribed, as they thought, liberally, they concluded to pay us that compliment. When we heard the sounds coming nearer and nearer, and saw the first torches pass our nearest neighbor's, I tore open the curtains, and scrambled to place fourteen lights in the front windows; being all I could get up on such short notice. Then I went to the front door and waved a great white cloth, and
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1869. I have read a good many of Taine's papers on Art, and always with great zest. His descriptions of Venice in Les Deux Mondes is wonderfully glowing and poetic. It was almost like seeing that city of enchantment. Max Muller's Clips I have never seen. The greatest extravagance I have committed for years was buying his Science of language, price seven dollars, as a birthday present for my philological mate. His habit of digging for the origin of words has proved contagious, and he often expresses surprise at the help my quick guesses afford him in his patient researches. I resolutely read Max Muller's Science of language, and picked up a good many new ideas and valuable suggestions; but to read it with full understanding required a great deal more learning than I possess. A friend is accustomed to say that my bark is worse than my bite ; and it is something so with regard to my theological intolerance. For instance, I have given yearly to
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
To the same. Wayland, 1869. I wish you joy of your new Greek grammar. I eschew all grammars, because I cannot receive their contents by intuition. Perhaps if you were to confine your investigation to the Greek article, you would find it more entertaining, but still the result might not be satisfactory. I have read of a German philologist who expended the diligent labor of a long life on the study of the Greek article, and on his deathbed he said to his son, Take warning by my example. Do not undertake too much. I ought to have confined myself to the dative case. I cordially agree with the praises of Unspoken sermons. They are the only kind that interest me. I was amused by the prematureness of Aggy; but of all the children I ever heard of, Susan L--'s eldest daughter has manifested the most precocious forecast. When she was about six years old, her father, in reading the newspaper aloud, read of a workman in a manufactory whose arm had been shockingly torn by the mach