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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 2 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for Milo or search for Milo in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
ured that he was a prisoner when his parents had been such consistent and generous friends of freedom; but after all, they have their reward in having a son to whom opportunities for moral greatness came not in vain. Your Robert, too,people say the war has ripened in him all manly qualities. God bless and protect the two young heroes! They told me in Boston that they had both offered to lead colored soldiers. Is it so? I thank you very much for the lovely photograph of S- . What a pity it is that the ancients were ignorant of this wonderful process! How I should like a photograph of Plato! and how I should like to have a representation of the Venus of Milo unmutilated. Nothing within my limited knowledge of ancient art affects me like that miraculous statue. Is it a Venus? Always it seems to me like the heroic Antigone proclaiming to the tyrant Creon that there is a higher law than that of kings. The physical beauty of the woman is wonderfully inspired with moral majesty.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
To the same. Wayland, 1873. I thank you cordially for the Diana, which is full of life and spirit. Spiritually, it is far inferior to the Venus of Milo, but it has an all-alive physical beauty which is charming. Thank you, also, for the bas-relief from Thorwaldsen. The little heads are delightfully child-like, but to my eye their perpendicular position conveys an idea of walking on the clouds, rather than that of floating, or flying. As I never expect to see any of the galleries of sculpture, it is a great treat to me to form a small stereoscopic gallery of my own, which, with the aid of imagination, is almost like seeing the originals. I agree with you that there are portions of the Old Testament too devout and sublime to be omitted in any Bible for the human soul. But I do not remember anything in the New Testament so demoralizing as Lot and his daughters, Noah's drunkenness, Jacob's dishonest trickery, and David's conduct to Uriah. I believe the constant reading of su
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
and last visits to the United States, 181; his explanation of England's attitude during the war, 181; lines to, 206; reminiscences of, 248. Tubinan, Harriet, alias Moses, 161. Tucker, St. George, testimony of, against slavery, 132, U. uncle Tom's Cabin, success of, 69; read in Siam, 216. Underwood, John C., expelled from Virginia, 108. Unitarianism a mere half-way house, 189. Unitarians, the, and R. W. Emerson, 34; convocation of, at New York, 189. V. Venus of Milo, the, 172, 218. Victor Hugo's tragedy of John Brown, 173. W. Wallcut, Robert F., 284. War anecdotes, 158, 161, 180, 204. Wasson, David A.. 80, 91. Wayland, Mass., Mrs. Child's home in XV. Webster, Daniel, willing to defend the slave-child Med, 20; statue of, 190; Ichabod, 259. Weiss's (Rev. John) biography of Theodore Parker. 179. Weld, Angelina Grimke, memorial of, 258. Weld, Theodore D., letter to, 258. Westminster Review, The, 202. White, Maria, 50. Whitney