Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for Edmund Quincy or search for Edmund Quincy in all documents.

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
ellow-citizens in the galleries that the trustees of the building had requested him to disperse the meeting and clear the hall. Turning the meeting out-of-doors was precisely what they wanted him to do. [The remainder of this letter has been lost, but the purport of it was, that on the mayor's complying with the demand that he should read the letter aloud to the meeting, it appeared that the trustees had desired him to disperse the mob, and not the meeting. The presiding officer (Mr. Edmund Quincy) thereupon called upon him to fulfil his duty and eject the mob from the hall, which was done within ten minutes, to the intense chagrin of the rioters and the discomfiture of the mayor, and the meeting proceeded without further serious interruption. The mayor, on leaving the hall, promised that an adequate police force should be sent to protect the evening meeting, and he then returned to the City Hall to issue an order that the hall should be closed and no meeting permitted there th
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
nknown. Oh, how I suffered! It tore me all to pieces. And now, in the spring-time, I cannot make the renovation of nature seem cheerful. But why should I cast my shadow over you? I told you of my sad experiences mainly to account for my neglected correspondence. I am rejoiced that Robert is so well pleased with his regiment. The Lord seems to have inspired the colored people to behave remarkably well all through this terrible conflict. When I was in Boston, last week, I said to Edmund Quincy that never in the course of my observation, or in my reading of human history, had I seen the hand of Providence so signally manifested as in the events of this war. He replied in a very characteristic way: Well, Mrs. Child, when the job is done up, I hope it will prove creditable to Providence. My own belief is that it will. Think of Victor Hugo's writing a tragedy with John Brown for its hero! A French John Brown! It is too funny. I wonder what the old captain himself would think
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
Philothea, by Mrs. Child, XI., 21. Pierce, Mrs. E. C,, letter to, 42. Pierce, Senator, of Maryland, on Uncle Tom's Cabin, 69. Pocasset tragedy, the, 254. Princess of Thule, A, by William Black, 223. Progress of Religious Ideas, The, by Mrs. Child, XII., 65, 77, 265. Progressive friends, meeting of the, 81. Prohibitory law, aim and effect of the, 222. Protestant reformation, the, helped on by base agents, 187. Protestant reformation in England, the, 32. Q. Quincy, Edmund, presides at an anti-slavery meeting, 150; anecdote of, 173. R. Randolph, John, on the insecurity of slave-holders, 133. Raphael and Michael Angelo, 76. Rejected Stone, The, by M. D. Conway, 160. Renan's Life of Jesus, 245. Richmond Enquirer, the, on the subserviency of the North, 73. Ripley, George, 22. Romance of the Republic, A, by Mrs. Child, XIX. Rothschilds, the, compel the Emperor of Austria to repeal oppressive laws against the Jews, 141. Russell, Mrs.