Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for Savage or search for Savage in all documents.

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
itic act with a halo of moral glory. This war has furnished many instances of individual nobility, but our national record is mean. But notwithstanding these misgivings, I am truly thankful for the proclamation. It is doing us a great good in Europe, and will be a powerful agent in helping on the change of feeling in England. I have always put a good deal of trust in the common people of England. Speaking of individual nobility, how beautifully and bravely young Russell behaved when Savage was wounded! I murmured that he was a prisoner when his parents had been such consistent and generous friends of freedom; but after all, they have their reward in having a son to whom opportunities for moral greatness came not in vain. Your Robert, too,people say the war has ripened in him all manly qualities. God bless and protect the two young heroes! They told me in Boston that they had both offered to lead colored soldiers. Is it so? I thank you very much for the lovely photogra
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Boston, 1878. I get fresh reinforcement of courage, trust, and hope whenever I hear Mr. Savage preach. He is a genuine, all-alive man, and in his earnest, straightforward way, he is doing a great work. He fills my soul so full of electricity that the sparks fly when any sham touches me. I have been reading all sorts of books: Renan's Jesus, Herbert Spencer's Philosophy, Omar Khayam, etc. What a very French Jesus Renan portrays. To think of its being all arranged to raise Lazarus, to produce an effect, because public opinion required that he should prove himself a prophet by restoring a dead man to life. There is a charm about the book, the descriptions are so home-like. But it is curious to observe how he fluctuates between the decisions of his own reason and his fear of making Jesus seem too human to please his readers. He represents Jesus as occasionally tacking and veering, adroitly, according to the popular breeze; and he certainly does so himsel
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
Raphael and Michael Angelo, 76. Rejected Stone, The, by M. D. Conway, 160. Renan's Life of Jesus, 245. Richmond Enquirer, the, on the subserviency of the North, 73. Ripley, George, 22. Romance of the Republic, A, by Mrs. Child, XIX. Rothschilds, the, compel the Emperor of Austria to repeal oppressive laws against the Jews, 141. Russell, Mrs. S. S., letters to, 246, 262. S. Sand, George, 205. Sargent, Miss, Henrietta, letters to, 24, 31, 54, 153, 156, 168, 206. Savage, Rev. Minot J., 245. Scudder, Miss, Eliza, letters to, 174, 180, 182, 183, 196; her verses to Mrs. Child, 175. Sears, Rev. E. H., 92. Searle, Miss, Lucy, letters to, 152, 155, 166, 167, 170. Seminole war, origin of the, 218. Sewall, Samuel E., letters to, 143, 232; Mrs. Child visits, 156. Sewall, Mrs. S. E., letters to, 197,234, 254, 257. Sex in education, by Dr. E. H Clarke, 229. Shaw, Miss, Sarah, letter to, 12. Shaw, Francis G., letters to, 30, 35, 37, 62, 70, 165