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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for Lucy Searle or search for Lucy Searle in all documents.

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Searle. (search)
To Miss Lucy Searle. Wayland, June 5, 1861. I return Silas Marner with cordial thanks. It entertained me greatly. His honest attempts at education were extremely amusing. What a genuine touch of nature was Eppie in the tole hole! What a significant fact it is in modern literature, that the working class are so generally the heroes. No princes in disguise are necessary now to excite an interest in the reader. The popular mind is educated up to the point of perceiving that carpenters, weavers, etc., are often real princes in disguise. The longer I live, the more entirely and intensely do my sympathies go with the masses. I am glad to see some amendment with regard to sending back fugitive slaves. Those at Fort Monroe are to be protected so long as Virginia continues in rebellion. God grant that all the slave-holders may rebel, and remain in rebellion, till the emancipation of their slaves is accomplished! Success to Jeff. Davis, till he goads the free States into doing
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Searle. (search)
To Miss Lucy Searle. Wayland, August 22, 1861. Three weeks ago I set out to come to see you and broke down half way. It was the hottest day we have had this summer, and I wilted under it so that I had no energy left. I took refuge in the antislavery office, and there remained in the shade till the hour arrived for returning home. It was the second day of August, and many anti-slavery friends were returning from the celebration of the first at Abington, so that quite a levee was held at the office the last hour I was there. I know of nothing that stirs up my whole being like meeting with old friends by whose side I entered into the great moral battle thirty years ago. It seems to me the early Christians must have experienced similar emotions when they met each other. Glorious old Paul! What an anti-slavery man he would have made, if his earthly lot had been cast in these times! Well, his friends were mobbed and despised by the world; but nevertheless, Christianity sat on the
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Searle. (search)
To Miss Lucy Searle. Wayland, 1862. So you dispute Gerrit Smith's testimony about my being wise and candid ? I cannot say I have much respect for my wisdom. I think less and less of it every year I live. But when I write for the public, I think I am generally candid. I do not profess to be so in my talk, because that bubbles up, and I do not take time to examine its spirit. We all present different phases of character, according to circumstances, and I think I do so more than most people. It is natural enough that Gerrit Smith should deem me wise. When I approach him, I don't go dancing on a slack rope, decorated with spangles and Psyche-wings; I walk on solid ground, as demurely as if I were going to meeting, with psalm book in hand. If I happen to catch a glimpse of a fairy by the way, she and I wink at each other, but I never let on. He supposes the chosen teachers of my mind to be profound statesmen and pious Christian Fathers. I never introduce to him any of my acqua
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Searle. (search)
To Miss Lucy Searle. Wayland, December 21, 1862. We live almost like dormice in the winter. Very few people are so completely isolated. But I warm up my little den with bright little pictures, and rainbow glories from prisms suspended in the windows. I am amused twenty times a day with their fantastic variations. Sometimes the portrait of Charles Sumner is transfigured by the splendid light, and sometimes the ears of my little white kitten, in the picture opposite, are all aglow. The moss on a stick of wood in the corner suddenly becomes iridescent, and then the ashes on the hearth look like the glittering soil where the metallic gnomes live. I am childish enough to find pleasure in all this, and to talk aloud to the picture of a baby that is being washed. But you must not infer from this that I live for amusement. On the contrary, I work like a beaver the whole time. Just now I am making a hood for a poor neighbor; last week I was making flannels for the hospitals; odd
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
ency of the North, 73. Ripley, George, 22. Romance of the Republic, A, by Mrs. Child, XIX. Rothschilds, the, compel the Emperor of Austria to repeal oppressive laws against the Jews, 141. Russell, Mrs. S. S., letters to, 246, 262. S. Sand, George, 205. Sargent, Miss, Henrietta, letters to, 24, 31, 54, 153, 156, 168, 206. Savage, Rev. Minot J., 245. Scudder, Miss, Eliza, letters to, 174, 180, 182, 183, 196; her verses to Mrs. Child, 175. Sears, Rev. E. H., 92. Searle, Miss, Lucy, letters to, 152, 155, 166, 167, 170. Seminole war, origin of the, 218. Sewall, Samuel E., letters to, 143, 232; Mrs. Child visits, 156. Sewall, Mrs. S. E., letters to, 197,234, 254, 257. Sex in education, by Dr. E. H Clarke, 229. Shaw, Miss, Sarah, letter to, 12. Shaw, Francis G., letters to, 30, 35, 37, 62, 70, 165, 177, 198, 205, 216, 218, 261. Shaw, Hon., Lemuel, letter to, 145. Shaw, Colonel Robert G., 172, 173, 235; death of, 176; proposed statue of, 190;