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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays. You can also browse the collection for Tom Jones or search for Tom Jones in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 8 (search)
t various points around the board, although I doubt whether Holmes, with water-drinkers two deep on each side of him, got really his share of the coveted beverage. If he had, it might have modified the course of his talk, for I remember that he devoted himself largely to demonstrating to Dr. Stowe that all swearing doubtless originated in the free use made by the pulpit of sacred words and phrases; while Lowell, at the other end of the table, was maintaining for Mrs. Stowe's benefit that Tom Jones was the best novel ever written. This line of discussion may have been lively, but was not marked by eminent tact; and Whittier, indeed, told me afterwards that Dr. and Mrs. Stowe agreed in saying to him that while the company at the club was no doubt distinguished, the conversation was not quite what they had been led to expect. Yet Dr. Stowe was of a kindly nature and perhaps was not seriously disturbed even when Holmes assured him that there were in Boston whole families not perceptib
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 13 (search)
ith untold horrors in the middle. I had given this lecture at Fall River, and was returning by way of the steamboat to Providence, when I heard one of my neighbors ask the other if she heard the lecture. No, she answered, I did n't. But Mis' Jones, she come home that night, and she flung her hood right down on the table, and says she, There, says she, Mr. Jones, I'm never goina to have another oa them mince pies in the house just as long as I live, says she. There was Sammy, says she, he wMr. Jones, I'm never goina to have another oa them mince pies in the house just as long as I live, says she. There was Sammy, says she, he was sick all last night, and I do believe it was nothina in all the world but just them mince pies, says she. Well, said the other lady, a slow, deliberate personage, I do suppose that them kind of concomitants ain't good things. Here the conversation closed, but Mr. Weller did not feel more gratified when he heard the Bath footmen call a boiled leg of mutton a swarry, and wondered what they would call a roast one, than I when my poor stock of phrases was reinforced by this unexpected poly