Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson. You can also browse the collection for Jonas H. French or search for Jonas H. French in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
escribes her collaring and pulling away a man who was shaking his fist in Mr. Phillips's face at Music Hall mob — and her surprise when he tumbled down. When Jonas H. French said, This is no place for women, she answered, They are needed here to teach civilization to men. Many years later, Colonel Higginson wrote of Wendell Phot till a quarter to eight by his clock. Most of the passengers evidently understood and got there about seven-thirty. Three quarters of the talk in the cars was French, and all the peasants are French. Worcester, December 3, 1857 [In] Montreal . . . I saw many delightfully wholesome-looking people, English and French. French. Worcester, December 3, 1857 [In] Montreal . . . I saw many delightfully wholesome-looking people, English and French. Among other excitements I went to a steeplechase, which is one of the most enlivening things I ever saw — riders galloping over a mile and half circle of farming country, taking hedges, ditches, and walls at full speed, the horses leaping like kittens, of course always at some risk of failure or delay. This multiplies the points
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter army life and camp drill (search)
s regiment, but Mr. Page has sent it all to the Tribune, they say. I am ashamed to be so praised; it is such a reproach on this undisciplined, unbuttoned mob we call an army. I hope it will never be my lot to write military memoirs; I should have to dip my pen in stronger superlatives than I ever mixed before. Here is the latest Beaufort anecdote. There is a New York regiment here which calls itself Les Enfans Perdus, or the lost children, being composed of all nations-officers chiefly French. One of these, the adjutant, was criticizing some of General Hunter's late movements, and some one in joke threatened him with Fort La Fayette. Vas dat you say! he cried in a rage; ven you say La Fayette, take off your hat (suiting the action to the word). Ven you say Vashinton, take off your ht (uncovering again). Ven you say Huntare, do as me,--ah-h-h (gripping his hat over his ears with both hands, grinding his teeth, and running away in an ecstasy of despair). You may fancy from thi