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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 85 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 56 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 37 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 30 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 26 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 6 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for David Lee Child or search for David Lee Child in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
y, he took refuge at first with a printer named Bennett, who had some Thomas H. Bennett. time previously printed a translation of Cicero's Orations in Mr. Allen's office, and who was now printing the Massachusetts Weekly Journal, of which David Lee Child A graduate of Harvard College, in the class of 1817; an able lawyer and an active politician, when induced to undertake the publication of the Journal as a Whig paper. After the failure of that enterprise, he did not long continue in practice at the bar. He was a forcible and prolific writer, and a man of undaunted courage. Mr. Child was married in 1828 to Miss Lydia Maria Francis. (See Letters of L. Maria Child, p. VIII. Boston, 1883.) was the editor. Bennett kept a boarding-house in Scott Court, leading from Union Street, and kindly allowed his young friend to remain with him until he could obtain work and the means to pay his board,—no easy matter at first, for business was dull and many were out of employment. Mr. Gar
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
published an antislavery pamphlet, The selling of Joseph; a memorial, in 1700 (reprinted in Williams's History of the negro race in America, 1: 210). (For his descent from Judge Sewall, see Titcomb's Early New England people, pp. 217-223.) Mr. May (who was born in 1797, and hence was eight years Mr. Garrison's senior) was a son of Col. Joseph May, of Boston, a highly respected merchant, and both he and his cousin Mr. Sewall graduated from Harvard College in 1817, in the same class with David Lee Child, George Bancroft, George B. Emerson, Caleb Cushing, Samuel A. Eliot, Stephen Salisbury, Stephen H. Tyng, and Robert F. Wallcut. It is worthy of note that Mr. May preached his first sermon in December, 1820, on the Sunday following the delivery of Daniel Webster's Plymouth Rock oration, and was so impressed by the latter's fervid appeal to the ministry to denounce the slave-trade that he read the fifty-eighth chapter of Isaiah in his morning service. Five years later he was interested
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
rolina, the latter from the Massachusetts Journal and Tribune, whose opinion was reinforced by the fact that the editor and writer of the article in question, David Lee Child, My husband was anti-slavery, wrote Mrs. Child in 1867, and it [slavery] was the theme of many of our conversations while Garrison was in prison ( Letters ofMrs. Child in 1867, and it [slavery] was the theme of many of our conversations while Garrison was in prison ( Letters of L. M. Child, p. 195). was a lawyer. His own comments follow in Lib. 1.9; ante, p. 196. a later number. Still a little space remains on the second page, and this shall be filled by verses signed G——n, but written who knows when or where amid all the distractions of the past six months? Universal emancipation. Though disly conversation on the friends and the foes of human freedom. His office was a rendezvous to which came men of all grades and professions—fellow-editors like David Lee Child, Massachusetts Journal and Tribune, Boston; John G. Whittier, New-England Weekly Review, Hartford, as George D. Prentice's successor; William J. Snelling, <
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
meeting was held at the same place, with ten present, Namely, according to the records, David Lee Child, Ellis Gray Loring, Isaac Child, W. L. Garrison, Robert Bernard Hall, John Cutts Smith, Olinson, Isaac Knapp, Joshua Coffin, and Samuel E. Sewall. and, after considerable discussion, David Lee Child, Samuel E. Sewall, William Lloyd Garrison, Ellis Gray Loring, and Oliver Johnson were appoilavery. But the spirits of the little company rose superior to all external circumstances. Mr. Child presided, and the preamble, as drawn by Mr. Snelling, was read as follows: We, the undersiwas again the cause of much earnest discussion without unanimity Lib. 5.3. being reached; Messrs. Child, Loring and Sewall withholding their signatures from the perfected instrument. Their scrue annual meeting in January, 1833, to succeed Mr. Garrison as Corresponding Secretary, while Messrs. Child and Loring were elected Counsellors. Mr. Sewall, however, only became a life member (by the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
e connection, and exhibiting in the process his Lib. 4.206, 207. characteristic singleness of moral purpose and cloudiness of logic. We remark, further, the first appearance in the anti-slavery ranks of Nathaniel Peabody Rogers, of Plymouth, N. H., already seeming a warm personal friend of Lib. 4.38. Mr. Garrison, and vouched for by the latter as an able lawyer and an enlightened Christian; Rogers was corresponding secretary of the local anti-slavery society, and, together with D. L. Child and S. E. Sewall, one of the trustees of the Noyes Academy at Canaan. N. H., which was opened in the fall of 1834 to colored youth on equal terms with white (Lib. 4.38, 169). of Rogers's neighbor, John Farmer, the antiquarian; of Farmer's Lib. 4.175. constant correspondent in Boston, Francis Jackson; Francis Jackson was born in Newton, Mass., in 1789, and became the historian of that town. His father, Timothy Jackson, was a minute-man who joined in the pursuit of the retreating Br