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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 4 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Moses Grant or search for Moses Grant in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
of his first lecture, his indebtedness to them and his shame that the churches had allowed themselves to be thus surpassed, he felt it incumbent upon him to explain that he was very far from sympathizing with their views on religious questions, and that he believed slavery could be abolished only through the power of the Gospel and of the Christian religion. The hall was pretty well filled when he began his address, and the audience included Dr. Lyman Beecher, Rev. Ezra S. Gannett, Deacon Moses Grant, and John Tappan (a brother of Arthur)—the last two, well-known and respected merchants; Rev. Samuel J. May, then settled as a Unitarian minister at Brooklyn, Connecticut, and the only one of the denomination in that State; his cousin, Samuel E. Sewall, a young Boston lawyer; and his brother-in-law, A. Bronson Alcott. It was natural that Mr. Sewall should find himself in sympathy with Mr. Garrison. His distinguished ancestor, Judge Samuel Sewall, was one of the earliest opponents
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
hanical obstacles to the birth of the new journal. The ream or two of Ms. Mar. 1, 1874, W. L. G. to O. Johnson; May's Recollections, p. 30; Lib. 21.18, 19. paper needed to produce a specimen number was sought to be obtained on credit of Deacon Moses Grant, of the firm of Grant & Daniell, an acquaintance in the temperance cause, who had entire respect for the partners and had previously been consulted by them about starting the Liberator. His refusal to let them have the modest amount asked fGrant & Daniell, an acquaintance in the temperance cause, who had entire respect for the partners and had previously been consulted by them about starting the Liberator. His refusal to let them have the modest amount asked for was, therefore, not from distrust of ultimate repayment, but from scruples about countenancing a paper having the anti-slavery character proposed. At last, a house to which the young men were both strangers was found to take the business risk, and the first number was launched. Simultaneously was received from James Forten, the greatly esteemed and Ms. Dec. 31, 1830, to W. L. G. venerated sailmaker of Philadelphia, the sum of fiftyfour dollars in advance for twenty-seven subscribers— ai