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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 44 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 32 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
Johnson's Garrison and his Times, p. 44. said Garrison, solemnly, you had better let all your irons burn than neglect your duty to the slave. The demand for immediate and unconditional emancipation was alarming to the Doctor, however. Your zeal, he said to Garrison, is commendable, but you are misguided. If you will give up your fanatical notions and be guided by us (the clergy), we will make you the Wilberforce of America. Of a very different mould from Dr. Beecher was the young Unitarian minister who now allied himself with Mr. Garrison. One of the sweetest and gentlest of men, disliking controversy with all his soul, he did not for a moment shrink from the path of trial which now opened before him. On the Sunday following the delivery of Mr. Garrison's lectures, Mr. May occupied the pulpit of Rev. Mr. Young at Church Green, in Summer Street. Of course, he said, I could not again speak to a May's Recollections, pp. 20-22. congregation, as a Christian minister, and be
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
n confessed his indebtedness for his views of the institution. Like Rankin, Osborn, and other early emancipationists, Bourne had seen slavery face to face (in Virginia). For tributes to his zeal and courage from Garrison and Lundy, see Lib. 2.35, 43, 133; 3.182. Perhaps no sight was more gratifying to him than that of a minister of the gospel appealing to the Book against African bondage. For this he could overlook theological differences as great as those which separated him from his Unitarian friend Mr. May, and which are measured by Lib. 2.67. his eulogy of a Dissertation on the Subject of Future Punishment, by Oliver Johnson, Editor of the Christian Soldier Lib. 2.40.—a logical, persuasive and solemn treatise, clearly establishing the desperate folly and absurd philosophy of the doctrine of universal salvation. Besides his formal discourses to the free people of color, Mr. Garrison addressed to them, on the eve of their Philadelphia National Convention, an editorial
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
the New England Lib. 4.71, 86; ante, p. 441. Convention of Anti-Slavery Societies, and presently among the committee on the address to the people of New England. Later still, he addressed the newly formed Cambridge Lib. 4.97, 103. Anti-Slavery Society, and joined in the general prudent assertion of that body's independence of the New England Society, and in general reprobation of intemperate language. A few months afterwards (Cambridge, October 15, 1834), in a letter to his fellow Unitarian, S. J. May, a man with a large gift of humor, Mr. Ware made the following highly amusing proposition: One point on which I wished to talk with you when here Memoir of H. Ware, Jr., p. 365. was, the character of the Liberator. If you sympathize with it, and approve wholly of its spirit, it would be in vain to say to you what I wish. But if not, if you feel how objectionable is its tone, how frequently unchristian its spirit, and how seriously it prejudices a great cause in the min
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
ed by Mr. Garrison in the Liberator, but we can find room here only Lib. 5.43, 47, 51. for these general prefatory remarks: It is a fact, alike indisputable and shameful, that the Lib. 5.43. Christianity of the 19th century, in this country, is preached and professed by those who hold their brethren in bondage as brute beasts! and so entirely polluted has the church become, that it has not moral power enough to excommunicate a member who is guilty of man-stealing! Whether it be Unitarian or Orthodox, Baptist or Methodist, Universalist or Episcopal, Roman Catholic or Christian, Pronounced with the first i long. A name assumed by a sect which arose from the great revival in 1801 (Bartlett's Dictionary of Americanisms'). it is full of innocent blood—it is the stronghold of slavery—it recognizes as members those who grind the faces of the poor, and usurp over the helpless the prerogatives of the Almighty! At the South, slaves and slaveholders, the masters and their victim