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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 44 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 32 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for Unitarian or search for Unitarian in all documents.

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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, V: the call to preach (search)
-Jurors or Disunion Abolitionists and my determination not only not to vote for any officer who must take oath to support the U. S. Constitution, but also to use whatever means may lie in my power to promote the Dissolution of the Union. . . . To Disunion I now subscribe in the full expectation that a time is coming which may expose to obloquy and danger even the most insignificant of the adherents to such a cause. In the following spring, describing to his mother a series of meetings, Unitarian, Anti-Slavery, and Association, of which he had chiefly attended the Anti-Slavery ones, Higginson said:— The most interesting and moving speech of all I have heard this week was by an old colored woman, Mrs. Thompson of Bangor, at one of the AntiSlav-ery meetings in Faneuil Hall. This old lady rose among the crowd and began to speak—all stood up to gaze on her, but she undaunted fixed her eyes on the chairman and burst out into a most ardent, eloquent and beautiful tribute of gratit
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VI: in and out of the pulpit (search)
tock in th' old saints; Mista Hinkerson [Higginson], daown ta the Port, 's the sweetest saint I ever knew. After attending some of the May anniversary meetings, Mr. Higginson reported that he had spoken his mind freely about the emptiness of Unitarian gatherings. Some present did not approve, and other elders who were there said it should have been said long ago and had been long felt. I am very sure that good will come of what I said: they need a note of discord to break the general monoeard from Sam Longfellow a few weeks since that he was thinking of leaving Fall River. Among settled divines the game of Puss-in-the-corner seems growing harder and hotter. The Fugitive Slave Law has mightily stimulated it. But how finely our Unitarian brethren have done and are doing, on that point. It shows the clergy to be a grade above politicians, after all, that the capitalists have less power to muzzle the Reverends than the Honorables. Perhaps you read an editorial of mine in the Co
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
room to the top of the house, through some lovely gardens full of roses, then to see Mrs. Cameron his neighbor and crony [the amateur photographer]. During his stay in London, Colonel Higginson preached for Mr. Conway at South Place Chapel (Unitarian). This sermon was reviewed in an English paper under the title A Warrior in the Pulpit. The author of the article said some anxiety was felt lest Colonel Higginson, whom he described as gentle in speech and manner as Colonel Newcome in societywho wrote the account of Buckle's Eastern travels), G. J. Holyoke (veteran radical), Mr. Blyden of Liberia (black and Mohammedan who has written on that subject in Fraser), Mrs. Rose (formerly of N. Y.), A. J. Eyres the philologist, and various Unitarian ministers. I spoke several times and twice succeeded in allaying incipient contests by suggesting phrases that reconciled different opinions, so that one speaker proposed to send me as arbitrator to reconcile the strikes now going on at the No
r individuality, 82; his address on Clergy and Reform, 83; becomes pastor of a Newburyport Church, 84, 85; marriage, 85; new home, 85, 86; parishioners, 86, 87, 94; dislikes forms of worship, 87; interest in working people, 88; and Free Soil Party, 89-91; and temperance, 91, 92, 116, 310; fondness for children, 94, 95, 120. 121, 257, 272; establishes evening school at Newburyport, 95; early acquaintance with noted persons, 96-100; and David Wasson, 100, 101; and F. B. Sanborn, 100, 129; on Unitarian gatherings, 100, 101; doubts fitness for ministry, 101, 102; early lectures, 102, 107; resigns from Newburyport church, 103, 104; lives at Artichoke Mills, 105, 106; preaches in a hall, 107; keeps up interest in Newburyport affairs, 107, 108; interest in public libraries, 108, 140; writes editorials, 110, 111; Thalatta, 111; and Fugitive Slave Law, III, 112; and Sims, 112-15; becomes pastor of Free Church in Worcester, 115, 116; leaves Newburyport, 117, 18; Worcester home, 118; preaches ow