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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 5: the New England period — Preliminary (search)
literary and commercial Boston of his day. At a time when almost all New England authors came from Harvard College, he stepped into the arena with only the merchants' powerful guild behind him. He was said to have modeled his style upon that of Macaulay, then a popular idol, and was also said to have been complimented by Macaulay himself. His memory was great, his reading constant, his acquaintance large, his perceptions ready and clear. What he wrote was so pithy, so candid, so neat, that yoMacaulay himself. His memory was great, his reading constant, his acquaintance large, his perceptions ready and clear. What he wrote was so pithy, so candid, so neat, that you felt for the moment as if it were the final word. It was only on the second reading that you became conscious of a certain limitation; the thought never went very deep, there was no wide outlook, no ideal atmosphere. While, therefore, his work had a considerable and wholesome influence upon his immediate audience, and was well worth doing, it cannot be considered as a strong original contribution to American letters. Women who wrote. The same disappearance of secondary figures applied
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
eply to Hayne. A collection of his Works appeared in 1851, and of his Private correspondence in 1856. Died in Marshfield, Mass., Oct. 24, 1852. Whipple, Edwin Percy Born in Gloucester, Mass., March 8, 1819. At the age of fourteen, he published articles in the Salem newspapers, and soon became superintendent of the news-room of the Merchants' Exchange, Boston. Eventually he gave up journalism to devote himself entirely to literature. He became known as a critic from his article on Macaulay, which appeared in the Boston Miscellany (1843); and the same year he began to lecture. He was literary editor of the Boston Globe, 1872-73. Among his publications are Essays and reviews (2 vols., 1848-49); selected lectures entitled Literature and life (1849) ; Character and characteristics of men (1866) ; The literature of the age of Elizabeth (1869) ; and Success and its conditions (1871). He also edited with James T. Fields the Family Library of British poetry (1878). There were issu
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
Pauline. 1833. Carlyle's Sartor Resartus. 1836. Dickens's Pickwick papers. 1837-1900. Victoria. 1841. Robert Peel Prime Minister. 1841. Punch established. 1842. Darwin's Coral Reefs. 1843. Wordsworth Poet-Laureate. 1843. Macaulay's Essays. 1843-1860. Ruskin's Modern Painters. 1846. Repeal of Corn Laws. 1847. Miss Bronte's Jane Eyre. 1847. Thackeray's Vanity Fair. 1848-1876. Macaulay's History of England. 1850. Wordsworth died. 1850. Tennyson Poet-LauMacaulay's History of England. 1850. Wordsworth died. 1850. Tennyson Poet-Laureate. 1850. Tennyson's In Memoriam. 1852. Thackeray's Henry Esmond. 1853. Kingsley's Hypatia. 1854-1856. Crimean War. 1856. Matthew Arnold's Poems. 1857. Indian Mutiny. 1859. Darwin's Origin of species. 1859. George Eliot's Adam Bede. 1862. Spencer's First principles. 1864. Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 1864. Newman's Apologia. 1865. Matthew Arnold's Essays in criticism. 1866. Swinburne's Poems and ballads. 1867. Disraeli Prime Minister. 1867. Parliame