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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 85 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 56 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 37 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 30 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 26 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 6 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for David Lee Child or search for David Lee Child in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ccompany me. I intend, if I can, to add Wendell Phillips to our company. So, you may make your arrangements, at your leisure, for at least one incendiary meeting in your place. Do not forget to suggest to my friend Child the importance of D. L. Child, as editor of the Standard. preparing, without delay, a stirring Address to the friends of the American Anti-Slavery Society, urging them to take prompt and effectual measures to insure a full attendance at the approaching anniversary, from al or (as commonly) Lib. 12.67. laid upon the table. Disunion was in the air. The first petition to Congress had been followed by others—from Ohio, New York, and Massachusetts again (this last, Lib. 12.38, 49, 50, 77, 81. most elaborate, as David Lee Child's compositions were wont to be, and able). But meantime the conspiracy for the annexation of Texas began to rear its head anew. Southern State legislatures adopted resolves in favor of Lib. 12.49. it which met with a willing reception in C
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
r rest, and the way he rests himself is to lecture Lib. 13.111, 117, 118. every night in the neighboring towns, and on Sundays in Northampton in the open air! D. L. Child, however, who took Boston in his way to New York to take the Standard, reports that he Lib. 13.123. looks well and seems well, with the exception of his enemy you my concluding article on Leavitt, See the whole series of articles, discussing anew the embezzlement of the Emancipator, in which Quincy had the help of D. L. Child, and compelled notice at the hands of Leavitt, Torrey, Elizur Wright, and Lewis Tappan (Lib. 13: 165, 169, 170, 171, 174, 179, 185, 201). The Whig papers eagerln was received with a burst of applause. The question of who should be editor of the Standard was also one of great importance. Great opposition was made to David Lee Child on account of his bias towards Whiggery, but the matter was referred to the Executive Committee to do the best they could in the premises. The meeting went o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
ams occupied a good deal of time, Videlicet, as a topic, not in person. and D. L. Child made an unfortunate show of zeal in defending his A. Lib. 14.19. S. characte majority, after vigorous opposition from all quarters—Ellis Gray Loring, David Lee Child, Joseph Southwick, Abner Sanger, William A. White, Of Watertown, Mass.n, and Thomas S. Cavender of Philadelphia; and James S. Gibbons of New York. Mr. Child, in accordance with a notice already given, withdrew from the editorship of tin our Union is our injustice to our colored brethren. They have Protest of D. L. Child, E. G. Loring, J. Southwick, J. S. Gibbons, etc. made a covenant with death t walk therein. Some of our friends who look on this revolutionary step as D. L. Child, E. G. Loring; ante, 1.279. impracticable were as strongly persuaded, at thedisunion in case Texas were annexed, Joshua Leavitt, in Ms. Sept. 17, 1844, D. L. Child to W. L. G. Lib. 14.81; cf. 17.14. precious paper, the Boston Morning Chroni
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
oke were quite as disagreeable—so that I was not sorry when I arrived at the depot. There I met with our old friend David Lee Child, whom I had not seen for a long time, and the pleasure at meeting was mutual. There is to be a Free Soil Convention in this town next week; and to-morrow Mr. Child begins a short tour through the county, for the purpose of addressing the people, and urging upon them the importance of sending delegates to the meeting. Bro. George drove down to the depot a G. W. Benson. few minutes after my arrival, and carried me and my baggage, with Mr. Child and Mrs. Hammond Eliza P. Hammond, formerly of New Ipswich, N. H., where her husband, an amateur portrait painter, had had Mr. Garrison for a sitter in January, actively as possible. Speaking of Mrs. Chapman's visit to Europe, for educational purposes in regard to her children, Mr. Child expressed much surprise and wonder at her choice, and said that he had supposed there was not steam power enough to dra