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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 654 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 393 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for George Ticknor or search for George Ticknor in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
d by the authorities to whom we have agreed to confide its interpretation,—of which the Supreme Court of the United States is the chief and safest,—or declare honestly that we can no longer in our consciences consent to keep it, and break it (George Ticknor to W. E. Channing, Apr. 20, 1842. Life of Ticknor, 2: 200). To the argument, that the words slaves and slaveholders are not to be found in the Constitution, and therefore that it was never intended to give any protection or countenance toTicknor, 2: 200). To the argument, that the words slaves and slaveholders are not to be found in the Constitution, and therefore that it was never intended to give any protection or countenance to the slave system, it is sufficient to reply, that though no such words are contained in that instrument, other words were used, intelligently and specifically, to meet the Necessities of slavery; and that these were adopted in good faith, to be observed until a constitutional change could be effected. On this point, as to the design of certain provisions, no intelligent man can honestly entertain a doubt. If it be objected, that though these provisions were meant to cover slavery, yet, as the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
t only reversed this principle, but added pecuniary inducements to commissioners to convict and to hold fast (Lib. 20: 153). or denounce the omission to provide any redress for the abuse of the authority conferred by the bill. For thus having convinced the understanding and touched the conscience of a nation, he was publicly thanked by some seven hundred addressers of Boston and Lib. 20.55, 57, 62. vicinity—great lawyers, like Rufus Choate and Benjamin R. Curtis; men of letters, like George Ticknor, William H. Prescott, and Jared Sparks (the last also the President of Harvard College); theologians like Moses Stuart, Leonard Woods, and Ralph Emerson of Andover Seminary. Half as many gentlemen of Newburyport confessed Lib. 20.73. their gratitude to Webster for his having recalled them to a due sense of their Constitutional obligations; and in this group we read the names of Francis Todd (who, if a novice in slave-catching, had known something of Ante, 1.180. slave-trading) and of
injustice yet, because to discuss the question of foreign policy I have a right. My nation is an object of that policy; we are interested in it; but to mix with interior party movements I have no right, not being a citizen of the United States. To Kossuth the last word, the measure of the man. In July, after two months seclusion in New York, he stole Lib. 22.118. away from the country, carrying nothing substantial as the result of his mission except ninety thousand dollars Life of Geo. Ticknor, 2.277. —the net proceeds of voluntary gifts and of the sale of Hungarian bonds. Already when he was at Memphis, on his voyage down the Mississippi, he had ceased to be the newest excitement of the American people. On March 20, 1852, Mrs. Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin appeared, to mock the legislatures, statesmen, and parties engaged in Lib. 22.62, 65, 94, 102; Pulszky's White, Red, and Black, 1.132, 133. affirming the Compromise measures to be final. It had previously been published pie