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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier. You can also browse the collection for Tom Jones or search for Tom Jones in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 8: personal qualities (search)
Lowell at the other, he was in the position of every one else, notably Longfellow; but he had plenty of humour and critical keenness and there was no one whose summing up of the affairs afterward was better worth hearing. On the noted occasion,--the parting dinner given to Dr. and Mrs. Stowe,--the only one where wine was excluded save under disguise, I remember Whittier's glances of subdued amusement while Lowell at the end of the table was urging upon Mrs. Stowe the great superiority of Tom Jones to all other novels, and Holmes at the other end was demonstrating to the Rev. Dr. Stowe that all swearing really began in the too familiar use of holy words in the pulpit. His unmoved demeanour, as of a delegate sent from the Society of Friends to represent the gospel of silence among the most vivacious talkers, recalled Hazlitt's description of the supper parties at Charles Lamb's parties which included Mrs. Reynolds, who being of a quiet turn, loved to hear a noisy debate. Hazlitt's