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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 22 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 18 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Matthew Arnold or search for Matthew Arnold in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
of the trials of the illness, to be accepted cheerfully. If you should come this way, after all, it would be a true kindness in you to call at Fox How, where the Arnolds will be at home for some time to come. The eldest son once told me Matthew Arnold. that he remembered the impression made on him in childhood, one winter evening early in 1839, by his father's voice in reading to Mrs. A. The Martyr Age, then just out in the Westminster Review. The boy was too young to enter into the story, but the deep emotion of his father's voice thrilled him, and that has been the association with your name in his mind ever since. Then, again, you know W. E. Forster is the husband of Dr. Arnold's eldest daughter; and you can be in no doubt how he feels towards you. I do hope you are seeing him in London, in spite of his anxious business in Parliament. . . . My dear friend, there is one word more that I must say. I value unspeakably your sympathy, and your sense of my sympathy, in the great