Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for George B. Cheever or search for George B. Cheever in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 1: no union with non-slaveholders!1861. (search)
lack flag of secession, hugged the men-stealers of the South to its bosom, and, while it could not fellowship the Church of the Puritans on account of its Rev. Geo. B. Cheever's church, N. Y. City. Abolitionism, could break sacramental bread with the traffickers in slaves and the souls of men! Need I say, my faithful friend anrthfulness and seriousness, A. S. Standard, Oct. 26, Lib. 31.174. and made a happy speech—full of good feeling, full of high hopes, full of trust in God. Dr. George B. Cheever and Horace Greeley also participated in the occasion. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. New York, Oct. 21, 1861. Ms. Yesterday, Mrs. Savin, Oliver, Wer way of dealing with tyranny than by knocking the tyrants in the head. After tea, I went with Oliver and Wendell, and Phoebe Cary, O. Johnson, W. P. G. to Dr. Cheever's church, to hear one of the series of anti-slavery lectures he is delivering Sunday evening. The assembly was very large, and the Dr. earnest as usual, but hi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
nner. The cries were renewed for me, and I said a few words, the applause being general and very marked. When I first entered the hall, and was conducted to a seat on the platform by the side of Mayor Opdyke, the audience broke out in repeated bursts of George Opdyke. applause. What a change in popular sentiment and feeling from the old mobocratic, pro-slavery times! And, remember, this was a meeting called by the Sixteenth Republican Ward Association! . . . Our opening session at Dr. Cheever's Church was attended May 12. by a thronged house, and in all respects a great success. As the Tribune of yesterday contained a very full report of the proceedings, you can judge of the spirit of the occasion by a perusal of it. Our evening meeting at the Cooper Institute was also an excellent one—Theodore Tilton making the opening speech (a very good one), and Phillips following in one of his finest efforts—Henry B. Stanton concluding the meeting in an impromptu, racy, and eloquent sp
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
ntroduced by Mr. Garrison, and unanimously adopted, made no allusion whatever to the Presidential question, but urged the enactment of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, and cited the massacre of colored soldiers at Fort Pillow and elsewhere as justifying the severest accusations of the abolitionists against slavery, of which it was the natural outgrowth. W. L. Garrison to his wife. New York, May 13, 1864. Ms. Our two public meetings, at the Cooper Institute and at Dr. Cheever's church, were attended with large and truly respectable and intelligent numbers, and went off with high interest and hearty approval. Thompson acquitted himself admirably on each occasion. Phillips was brilliant and eloquent as usual, but somewhat contradictory in statement, and decidedly opposed to the reflection of Abraham Lincoln. Of course, I briefly expressed my dissent, and gave the reasons why I thought the people would stand by him for another term. The audiences were overwhe
nce Ms. Apr. 13. which first settled me in my abhorrence of slavery, was learning and declaiming, while a school-boy in Western New York, a sonnet entitled The Free Mind, written by you while in a Southern prison. I found the piece in Dr. Geo. B. Cheever. Cheever's Commonplace Book of poetry. This sonnet maintains its place in the anthologies of more recent years—either alone, as in The Cambridge Book of poetry and song (New York, 1882), or with other examples, as in the Library of religCheever's Commonplace Book of poetry. This sonnet maintains its place in the anthologies of more recent years—either alone, as in The Cambridge Book of poetry and song (New York, 1882), or with other examples, as in the Library of religious poetry (New York, 1885), and in Harper's Cyclopaedia of British and American Poetry (New York, 1881). To the numerous collections of this sort which my father owned and enjoyed reading, he purposed adding one of his own, consisting of reformatory pieces, and virtually did get it together. But his standard of admission was the moralist's. His Liberator column of poetical selections and contributions exhibits his indulgence for mediocre original verse in view of its reformatory motive—and <