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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 85 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 56 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 37 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 30 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 26 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 6 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for David Lee Child or search for David Lee Child in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 2: the hour and the man.—1862. (search)
people who expected all sorts of infidel propositions, were pleasantly disappointed to hear a thoroughly Christian address, and one which contained a greater amount of direct quotations from the sacred Scriptures, we venture to say, than any sermon or oration that will find utterance in this town this week. . . . The address was wonderfully vitalized and wonderfully clear—without denunciation and without bitterness, wrote the correspondent of the Springfield Republican (Lib. 34: 136); and Mrs. Child wrote: Garrison's address is admirable; one of the best things he ever did, which is saying a good deal (Ms., Sept. 7, 1862, to R. F. Wallcut). At the close of it, Professor Bascom (who introduced me) expressed his John Bascom. gratification, and said he endorsed every word of it. The audience was not very large, as twenty-five cents were asked for a ticket admitting the holder to both lectures. Hardly any of the Faculty were present except Prof. Bascom. In the evening, Prof. Fowler gav
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
ning of July 4th, Thomas Bazley, M. P. for Manchester, presiding, and George Thompson coming down from London to participate. The address of welcome was moved by Rev. S. Alfred Steinthal, an old friend and correspondent of the Liberator, and Jacob Bright was among the speakers. At a Ladies' Reception given him at the same place the following evening, Mr. Garrison described the heroic women of the anti-slavery movement in America, and in extolling Lucretia Mott, the Grimkes, Mrs. Foster, Mrs. Child, and Mrs. Chapman, he did not forget to name also the clear-sighted Elizabeth Ante, 1.146. Heyrick of England. Newcastle-on-Tyne was next visited, and four July 6-10. delightful days were spent with Mr. and Mrs. John Mawson and family in their beautiful home at Gateshead. Mr. Mawson presided at the crowded soiree given to Mr. Garrison on the evening of July 9, in the Assembly Rooms at Newcastle, and his voice faltered with emotion as he testified that their guest, after receiving a n
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
d almost choking at times with the thoughts and words to which he tried to give utterance. Dear Angelina was very deeply affected. Other funerals at which Mr. Garrison spoke were those of Joseph and Thankful Southwick, James Brown Yerrinton, William Adams, Bourne Spooner and wife, Mary Ann W. Johnson, William C. Nell, James Miller McKim, Edmund Jackson, Abby May Alcott, Charles C. Burleigh, and as many more not named. His tributes to Richard D. Webb, James Haughton, Charles Sumner, David Lee Child, Gerrit Smith, and Henry Wilson will be found in the N. Y. Christian Union, April 9, 1873, Independent, March 19, 1874, Jan. 7, 1875, and Boston Journal, Nov. 29, 1875. Angelina Grimke Wild. Ever generous in panegyric to those who had passed from their earthly labors, Mr. Garrison was no less given to rehearsing the praises of his old coadjutors who still remained. He constantly took occasion, if writing them on other themes, to express his exalted regard for them. He was even re
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 11: last years.—1877-79. (search)
nued to attract him. An affectionate interchange of letters took place between himself and Whittier in December, Mss. Dec. 18, 20, 1877. when the latter's seventieth birthday was celebrated; and to the many public tributes paid the poet, Mr. Garrison contributed a friendly and critical estimate in blank verse, through the columns of the Boston Literary Dec. 1, 1877. World. A new friendship, which he greatly enjoyed, was formed in the spring of 1878, when he became acquainted, through Mrs. Child, with the gifted sculptress, Miss Anne Whitney of Boston, and was invited by her to sit for his portrait bust. During the months of March, April, and May he made frequent visits to her studio, and gave her full opportunity to study his features and character. His mobility of expression in animated conversation revealed to her the difficulty of her task—a difficulty enhanced, in respect to the eyes, by the fact that spectacles cannot well be reproduced in sculpture. Mr. Phillips held t
on why you should not say B. For example, if a bell is lifted from the table by the unseen agency, it is not past belief that the table itself may in turn be lifted from the floor; and so on through the whole round of physical manifestations. He witnessed, as he says above, a very great variety of manifestations in daylight and in dark, at the houses of Ante, 3.375, 408; 4.253. friends, at the rooms of mediums, in his own home, both with and without mediums. As to this class he wrote to Mrs. Child in 1857: I do not greatly wonder at your Ms. Feb. 6. distrust of professional paid mediums; and yet, is it unreasonable, if I ask a person to give me his time, his room, etc., for him to require some remuneration, especially when (as is generally the case) he is very poor? Beyond a doubt, some mediums are base impostors, and are pursuing the business merely as selfish adventurers. My mother did not look kindly on Spiritualism, not Ms. Feb. 17, 1857, W. L. G. to H. E. G. envying my f
ng is implied. For passage read sentence, and dele etc. Page 3, line 13 from bottom. Old Town was part of Newbury, Mass. Page 4, line 13. Dele both commas. Page 12, note 3. The record reads, conformably to our guess, and here with her Child. Page 14, line 5. Read, Kinsale, County Cork, Munster. Page 78, line 12, and page 98, line 10. For Malcolm read Malcom. Page 87, line 17. For Handwich read Hardwick. Page 132. The passage quoted in the second paragraph is from Fishvis denied having heard Preston's threat (being either engaged or absent). See Lib. 12: 177. Page 315. The writer of the letter of Nov. 14, 1839, was the Rev. L. D. Butts (Lib. 17: 24). Page 360, line 4 from bottom. The denial concerning Mr. Child is not quite accurate. See post, 3: 20, note 2, and 49, 83, 101. Page 395, second paragraph. For Quarterly Review read Edinburgh Review. Volume III. Page 354, note 2. To show the difficulty of attempting to write history with enti