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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 1: no union with non-slaveholders!1861. (search)
ld have given slavery a fresh lease of life and power. They included the admission of slavery Greeley's American Conflict, 1.376, 377, 399-402. to the Territories south of latitude 36° 30′; forbade all responsibility for your evil course! A somewhat similar attitude was assumed by other Greeley's American Conflict, 1.358-9. leaders of public opinion, who shrank from the horrors of a civil played so infamous a part in Maryland, and slaves have been driven from Fort Pickens, and even Greeley has talked with bated breath on the subject of slavery, in recent articles in the Tribune. No! h—full of good feeling, full of high hopes, full of trust in God. Dr. George B. Cheever and Horace Greeley also participated in the occasion. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. New York, Oct. 21, 18reeable hour with the two female poets, Alice and Phoebe Cary, whose house is much visited. Horace Greeley was one of the company. We had some little discussion together on the peace question. He t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 2: the hour and the man.—1862. (search)
ments the author of the Gettysburg Address ever penned—Mr. Lincoln recommended the adoption of Greeley's American Conflict, 2.259. a resolution by Congress to this effect: That the United States, indelightful pithiness, this old West-Pointer announced that, as the States of Georgia, Florida, Greeley's American Conflict, 2.246; Lib. 32.83. and South Carolina had taken up arms against the Unitedlowing, Just a month before this (Aug. 22) Mr. Lincoln had addressed his famous letter to Horace Greeley, stating that his paramount object was to save the Union, without reference to slavery. If ended no modification of his oft-expressed personal wish that all men everywhere could be free (Greeley's American Conflict, 2: 250). Not until two years later did it become publicly known that Mr. Lst draft of the Emancipation Proclamation to the Cabinet a month before he wrote this letter to Greeley (July 22), and was holding it in his desk until a decisive victory of the Union armies should a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
d himself in a way to gather fresh laurels for his brow. His speech was reported in full in the The State of the Country. Tribune of Tuesday morning. At the conclusion of it, I was loudly called for, but held back. Then calls were made for Horace Greeley, who came forward and made a few remarks in his queer-toned voice and a very awkward manner. The cries were renewed for me, and I said a few words, the applause being general and very marked. When I first entered the hall, and was conductedpose themselves in encountering an enemy who had threatened enslavement to the black soldiers, and death to their white officers, if captured in battle, See Jeff. Davis's message and the bill passed by the Confederate Congress on the subject (Greeley's American Conflict, 2: 523, 524). and whose bitterness would be intensified by the sight of their Massachusetts flag. He had not, however, anticipated the test that was soon to be brought home to himself. When it became evident that enough re
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
arger proportional vote than Boston for universal liberty; The court in which Mr. Garrison was tried and sentenced is now presided over by a radical Abolitionist—Judge Hugh L. Bond, one of the most indefatigable and influential Unionists in the State, who, to gratify our curiosity, hunted up from the old records of the court the time-yellowed papers of indictment against Mr. Garrison, which that gentleman, putting on his spectacles, perused with eyes as full of merriment as we noticed in Horace Greeley's, on being dismissed from his contempt of Judge Barnard's court. As we had threatened to put Mr. Garrison into his old cell, and shut him up for a night, we were disappointed to learn that the city authorities, not foreseeing how they were spoiling a good historical incident, had torn down the old jail and built a new one in its place—where, however, not the opposers but abettors of slavery and treason are now confined! Thus the gallows which was built for Mordecai, is used for hangin
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 7: the National Testimonial.—1866. (search)
and in correspondence with her absent children. The domestic event of the year was the birth June 14. at Rockledge of their first grandchild, whose advent gave Agnes Garrison. them unspeakable delight, and whom Mr. Garrison never wearied of carrying in his arms, lulling to sleep, or entertaining with song or piano. He refused to sign a petition, presented by George Shea of New York, for Jefferson Davis's release from Fortress Monroe, and had no disposition to join Gerrit Smith and Horace Greeley in that movement. Always opposed to capital punishment, he declared that if Davis, with his colossal guilt, escaped the gallows, hanging ought certainly to be forever abolished. The election, in the fall of 1866, of a former compositor on the Liberator as the first Chas. L. Mitchell. colored member of the Massachusetts Legislature afforded him great satisfaction. Deprived of his income from the Liberator, prevented by his injuries from writing or lecturing, his wife permanently cri
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
can ratification meeting in Faneuil Hall, or, at the request of Horace Greeley, to write an Ms. July 23, 1868. address to the freedmen, urging them to vote for Grant— Greeley to O. Johnson. believing himself too little known to the beneficiaries of his life-long endeavors in behalthe following year, when the Democracy made a final rally under Horace Greeley, and Sumner (for personal reasons and general considerations ofer Aug. 3, 1872. to the colored voters of Washington on behalf of Greeley, was very widely copied by the press, and presumably had its effece), Mr. Garrison replied at length to Mr. Sumner's last appeal for Greeley on the eve of departing for Europe. Of Mr. Greeley's course in Mr. Greeley's course in consenting to stand as the candidate of the Democratic Party, he wrote with great Ind. Sept. 12, Oct. 3, 24, 31, Dec. 15, 1872. plainness anirmed by the publication Century Magazine, June, 1888, p. 291. of Greeley's extraordinary letter to President Lincoln after the battle of Bu