Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for James Jackson or search for James Jackson in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
to rule over us for the next four years. Without lending myself to the exulting anticipations of the Whigs, I can no longer hesitate to believe that Van Buren will lose his election, and by a very large majority. I fear the coming six months will be a perfect Saturnalia in our poor country: the Whigs, elated with success, hungry by abstinence from office for twelve years, and goaded by the recollection of ancient wrongs, will push their victory to the utmost. Of course, the example set by Jackson will be followed, and perhaps improved upon; there will be a general turn-out of all present office-holders at home and abroad; the war of parties will have new venom. . . . There is so much passion, and so little principle; so much devotion to party,and so little to country in both parties, that I think we have occasion for deep anxiety. . . . The Whigs have met with their present surprising and most unexpected success by means of their low appeals to hard cider, log-cabins, and the like.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
now, if you will, go on, neglect exercise, neglect sleep, study late and early, stoop over your table, work yourself to death, grieve all your friends and break my heart; for where, dear Charlie, at my time of life, shall I find a friend to love as I love you? Jan. 1, 1844. A happy New Year to you, dear Charlie,—the first I have wished to any one, save Julia. I want a gift, a great favor, from you. Do you promise? I know you do. Well, after you have read this, write a note to Dr. James Jackson, and ask him to name a time when he can talk a half-hour with you. Go and submit your whole case to him; tell him, if you will, that you are as strong as a bullock; that you can digest as many oysters even as Felton that you care for nothing: but tell him your hereditary and constitutional peculiarities of body, your mode of life, your habits,—every thing. He will tell you what sort of life you should lead in order to be for the longest possible time useful and happy. Among the g
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 1, 1844. (search)
Jan. 1, 1844. A happy New Year to you, dear Charlie,—the first I have wished to any one, save Julia. I want a gift, a great favor, from you. Do you promise? I know you do. Well, after you have read this, write a note to Dr. James Jackson, and ask him to name a time when he can talk a half-hour with you. Go and submit your whole case to him; tell him, if you will, that you are as strong as a bullock; that you can digest as many oysters even as Felton that you care for nothing: but tell him your hereditary and constitutional peculiarities of body, your mode of life, your habits,—every thing. He will tell you what sort of life you should lead in order to be for the longest possible time useful and ha
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
faithful attentions of the eminent physician, Dr. James Jackson, his friend Dr. Fisher came often to see him. Dr. Jackson thought his symptoms alarming, and had but slight hope of his recovery, and so frankly informed hist at my desk for several days. I have been under Dr. Jackson's care,—the victim of a slow fever. I was glad tn my life; and I understand that for several days Dr. Jackson and several others entertained but faint hopes fo which I felt within me the instinct of recovery, Dr. Jackson solemnly told me that my case was incurable, and nd ancestral trees which surround your mansion. Dr. Jackson thinks I may leave town next Wednesday, when I prseek among green fields and in pure air. . . . Dr. Jackson still insists that my condition is very serious, an the laurel. Wednesday forenoon, Aug. 28. Dr. Jackson has called this morning and given me some partingt in search of health. To this I have descended. Dr. Jackson still insists that my condition is very serious,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Wednesday fore, Aug. 28. (search)
Wednesday forenoon, Aug. 28. Dr. Jackson has called this morning and given me some parting advice. After he had gone came the gentle Fisher, who desired to make an examination of me, that he might satisfy himself and you. The result of his examination has restored my confidence in myself. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I s