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History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 22 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904. You can also browse the collection for Harley D. Maxwell or search for Harley D. Maxwell in all documents.

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otted plants, and cut flowers from Holmes' Somerville nurseries. Shortly after 8 o'clock a reception was held by Rev. H. D. Maxwell and Mrs. Maxwell, Mrs. Lydia A. Shaw, Mrs. L. H. Brown, John F. Mills, A. A. Wyman and wife, Miss Angie Williams, Gs, and prominent residents of the city, assembled in the auditorium of the church for the anniversary exercises. Rev. Harley D. Maxwell, the pastor of the church, presided, and displayed his shrewdness as chairman by announcing each speaker's time lckground. The exercises opened with an organ voluntary by J. L. Dennett, which was followed by the invocation by Rev. H. D. Maxwell. The church choir, Miss Anna Florence Smith, soprano, Mrs. William E. Miller, alto, W. H. S. Hill, tenor, and E. . Rev. Francis A. Gray read the scriptures, and prayer was offered by Rev. Charles A. Skinner, a former pastor. Rev. H. D. Maxwell preceded his introduction of the first speaker with a few eloquent words of welcome. The city of Somerville, said
quartette sang Spring Song and Forget Me Not, and Miss Smith, the soprano of the church quartette, sang The Willows. Following the serving of the supper, Rev. H. D. Maxwell called the company to order, and gave a very happy address of welcome, interspersing his remarks with many apt stories. He called upon Rev. Chester Gore Mif his characteristic addresses, teeming with stories to illustrate the points he desired to make. He paid a high tribute to the work of the present pastor, Rev. H. D. Maxwell. Following the speaking there was a general renewing of old acquaintance and hand-shaking. The decorations consisted of greens wound about and from the pillars. A large 1854-1904 motto was on the wall just above the centre of the head table. At the head table were seated Rev. H. D. Maxwell and wife, Rev. Charles A. Skinner, Rev. L. M. Powers, Rev. R. Perry Bush, Rev. William M. Kimmell, Rev. Chester Gore Miller, Charles A. Kirkpatrick, Mrs. M. M. Runey, Mrs. Parnell M. Haye
Anniversary exercises, Wednesday evening, February 17 Order of service 1. Organ prelude ............................Buck 2. Invocation. Rev. H. D. Maxwell. 3. Anthem—The Lord is my Light.Horatio Parker 4. Bible reading. Rev. F. A. Gray 5. Prayer. Rev. Charles A. Skinner. 6. Address—Charles Tufts. Rev. E. H. Capen, D. D. 7. Historical address. John F. Ayer 8. Anniversary hymn—Cross Street, C. M., F. M. Hawes 9. Address. Rev. Charles Conklin. 10. Address. Rev. Charles A. Skinner. 11. Anthem—Rock of Ages..........Dudley Buck 12. Greeting from the Winter-hill Universalist Church. Rev. F. A. Gray. 13. Greeting from the West Somerville Universalist Church. Rev. William Couden. 14. Address. Rev. L. M. Powers. 15. Hymn No. 609. 16. Organ postlude ...........................Reed Extract from address Rev. E. H. Capen, D. D., President of Tufts College After the death of Charles Tufts, I made several calls on Mrs. Tufts, w
Rev. H. D. Maxwell The present pastor of the church, Rev. Mr. Maxwell, was born at Moore's Mills, N. B., thirty-two years ago. He received his earlier education in the public schools of his native town. He entered the Divinity School at Tufts College in September, 1889, and graduated in the class of 1893. During the summer of 1892 Mr. Maxwell preached at Leeds Centre and Keene's Corner, Me., and in the summer of 1893 he preached at Addison, Harrington, and Cherryfield, Me., which was one of Rev. L. M. Powers' old summer circuits. In the fall of 1893 he received calls to Universalist churches in New Britain, Conn., and Hyannis, but declined both. In January, 1894, Mr. Maxwell accepted a call to the pastorate of the Universalist Church in Brattleboro, Vt., where he remained until 1899. He also had charge of the Universalist Churches at Vernon and Guilford, Vt., during the five years. In 1896 he received a call from the Universalist Church in Brookline, but declined it. In Fe
the bravest at home. This is the only time, in the history of the church, so far as can be learned, that a regular morning service was omitted. Naturally a disappointment to Mr. Powers and all the parish, it was, perhaps, best, for, at a reception given the next night, the farewells were more appropriately said. The parish, profiting by its previous experience, did not allow a long time to elapse before securing a new pastor. In less than two months from the time Mr. Powers left, Rev. H. D. Maxwell was called. Mr. Maxwell, who at the time was pastor of the Universalist Church in Brattleboro, Vt., had, by request of the parish committee, preached at two morning services. Both days were stormy, and small congregations greeted him, but when the parish meeting was held, on January 16, 1899, Mr. Maxwell's name led all the rest on the informal ballot, and he was at once unanimously elected to the pastorate. He began his labors in Somerville the first Sunday in March, 1899. Dur
frequently coming from long distances to be present. The rapid growth of the club under the vigorous administration of its first president, Mr. Mills, and his able corps of officers amply shows how well and heartily were these efforts supported by our members. Isaiah H. Wiley was our second president, being elected December 21, 1899, and continuing in office for six years. The other officers were F. W. Marden, vice-president, A. M. Haines, secretary, F. M. Wilson, treasurer, and Rev. H. D. Maxwell, Harry Haven, and A. E. Southworth as executive committee, who have ably assisted him in his many and varied successes, both from the standpoint of rapid gains in membership and from the delightful programmes brought for our consideration. The season of 1904 opened with the following board of officers: President, I. H. Wiley; vice-president, F. W. Marden; secretary, Roy K. Goodill; treasurer, F. L. Coburn; executive committee, A. M. Haines, F. DeWitt Lapham, and Frank Lowell; and a
The Mission Circle Rev. H. D. Maxwell This organization was formed in our parish on January 22, 1901. On that day a meeting of ladies was held in the church parlors for the purpose of listening to an address upon the subject of Mission Circles by Mrs. Zelia E. Harris, of Worcester, then president of the Woman's Universalist Missionary Society of Massachusetts. After she had presented the claims of the work, Rev. J. F. Albion, of Malden, and Miss Emma F. Foster, president of the Maiden circle, gave interesting descriptions of the purposes and opportunities of societies of this kind. The pastor of the Cross-street Church gave the work his warmest and most enthusiastic approval. At the conclusion of the speaking an organization was effected, and the following officers were provisionally elected: President, Mrs. Clara P. Haven; vice-president, Mrs. Mary Prescott; secretary, Mrs. Robert Hayes; treasurer, Mrs. Achsa M. Mills. The president and pastor were appointed a committee t
.83 Boston Street Marden, Louise83 Boston Street Marsten, Marion20 Sever Street, Charlestown Maxwell, Rev. and Mrs. H. D.80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Bernard80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Dorothy80 MyrtMaxwell, Bernard80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Dorothy80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Marjory 80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Imogene 80 Myrtle Street Mayo, Liva A.14 Chester Avenue Mess, Mr. and Mrs. J. W.19 Chester Avenue Messer, Mrs. M. J.27 Franklin Street MeMaxwell, Dorothy80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Marjory 80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Imogene 80 Myrtle Street Mayo, Liva A.14 Chester Avenue Mess, Mr. and Mrs. J. W.19 Chester Avenue Messer, Mrs. M. J.27 Franklin Street Messer, Millie27 Franklin Street Messer, Theodore27 Franklin Street McAllister, Gaylie9 Louisburg Place McCullough, Eva11 Franklin Street McFarland, Bessie121 Highland Avenue McIntire, Lee.15 BroaMaxwell, Marjory 80 Myrtle Street Maxwell, Imogene 80 Myrtle Street Mayo, Liva A.14 Chester Avenue Mess, Mr. and Mrs. J. W.19 Chester Avenue Messer, Mrs. M. J.27 Franklin Street Messer, Millie27 Franklin Street Messer, Theodore27 Franklin Street McAllister, Gaylie9 Louisburg Place McCullough, Eva11 Franklin Street McFarland, Bessie121 Highland Avenue McIntire, Lee.15 Broadway Miers, Louis3 Washington Street Miller, Alice255 Medford Street Mills, Mr. and Mrs. John F.7 Lincoln Street Mills, Mary 7 Lincoln Street Mills, Hubert61 Tufts Street Mills, Bessie 17 BonaiMaxwell, Imogene 80 Myrtle Street Mayo, Liva A.14 Chester Avenue Mess, Mr. and Mrs. J. W.19 Chester Avenue Messer, Mrs. M. J.27 Franklin Street Messer, Millie27 Franklin Street Messer, Theodore27 Franklin Street McAllister, Gaylie9 Louisburg Place McCullough, Eva11 Franklin Street McFarland, Bessie121 Highland Avenue McIntire, Lee.15 Broadway Miers, Louis3 Washington Street Miller, Alice255 Medford Street Mills, Mr. and Mrs. John F.7 Lincoln Street Mills, Mary 7 Lincoln Street Mills, Hubert61 Tufts Street Mills, Bessie 17 Bonair Street Mills, Alice17 Bonair Street Mills, Lucy 17 Bonair Street Mills, Gertrude17 Bonair Street Milbury, Roy159 Glen Street Moore, Harley81 Boston Street Moore, Viola103 Flint Street Munroe