Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for May 22nd or search for May 22nd in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 45: an antislavery policy.—the Trent case.—Theories of reconstruction.—confiscation.—the session of 1861-1862. (search)
ssional Globe, pp. 2334-2337, 2346, 2552, 2556. (that on life insurance being exempted without controversy), contending that the duty was a tax upon a tax, a tax upon a premium, and a tax on something which was in itself almost a charity. He received for his efforts in this direction the thanks of the insurance companies of Boston. He spoke briefly for taxing receipts for passengers, but not for freight; May 24, Congressional Globe, p. 2333. for a higher duty on whiskey and tobacco; May 22, Congressional Globe, pp. 2283, 2315; May 27, Globe, p. 2367. a lower duty on salt; June 5, Congressional Globe, p. 2579. and the exemption of paper from tax as a tax on books. May 23, June 5, Congressional Globe, pp. 2317, 2579. In later sessions he sought reductions in the internal taxes, and particularly the repeal of the income tax, March 17, 1868, Congressional Globe, p. 1918; April 7, 1870. Works, vol. XIII. pp. 370-374. June 22 and July 1, 5, 1870, Globe, pp. 4709, 5095, 51
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 46: qualities and habits as a senator.—1862. (search)
en absent from his seat three minutes since it was taken up, or half an hour since the session began. May 30, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 110, 111. Near the end of the session he spoke forcibly against a final adjournment until the public business was completed, pointing out that Congress was by several weeks short of the limit which it was accustomed to reach when members were paid by the day instead of by the year. July 12 (Works, vol. VII. pp. 176-179). He had made similar remarks May 22 (Congressional Globe, p. 2225). The New York Evening Post, June 7, 1862, had an article of the same tenor. In declining an invitation to attend a public meeting in the city of New York, he said, A senator cannot leave his place more than a soldier. July 14, 1862. Works, vol. VII. pp. 180, 181. It has often occurred in the Senate,—and it occurred many times during this session, in which the duties of patriotism were most exacting,—that it was obliged to adjourn for want of a quorum,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
ections he had so well urged against the Johnson-Clarendon convention. Sumner made the principal speech upon the treaty, May 19, entering fully into all the points of the negotiation, stating in what respects it met the objections to the rejected convention, explaining the rules to be such as we had heretofore insisted upon, and while not thinking the result as complete as it should be, regarded the treaty as promising substantial good, and supported it by his vote. Sumner, on May 20 and 22, denied in the Senate the truth of reports of his speech on the treaty, calling that in the New York Herald, May 20, a pure invention (Congressional Globe, pp. 889. 890); and the one in the Washington Chronicle, May 25, a fabrication (Globe, p. 891). Sumner appears to have spoken in executive session, May 10, in favor of the publication of the treaty (Boston Journal, May 11). He expressed the opinion that it would be hailed with joy by the thinking men of Great Britain and the United States.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
dissent from their own party. Harper's Weekly approved, Aug. 24, 1872, Blaine's criticism of Sumner's course. Sumner had been preparing for some weeks a speech against the re-election of President Grant, Sumner, in interviews, May 16 and 22. and in a letter to the colored people of Arkansas, May 22, had given intimations of his course. New York Tribune, May 17 and 23. and Congress had appointed June 3 as the end of the session. The report on the sale of arms to France had come in sMay 22, had given intimations of his course. New York Tribune, May 17 and 23. and Congress had appointed June 3 as the end of the session. The report on the sale of arms to France had come in so late that no time could be set apart for its consideration. Sumner was obliged to take advantage of some opportunity, and moving (May 31) the indefinite postponement of the appropriation bill, he began, unexpectedly to the public, his speech, and held the floor for three hours. Works, vol. XV. pp. 83-171. He wore on that day the appearance of deep-seated conviction. He knew well enough what he would have to encounter, but there was no hesitation in his manner or voice. Many seats were v