Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for George S. Hillard or search for George S. Hillard in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 44: Secession.—schemes of compromise.—Civil War.—Chairman of foreign relations Committee.—Dr. Lieber.—November, 1860April, 1861. (search)
r in the Union army. Lieber's Life and Letters, p. 318. It somewhat corroborates Sumner's view of Lieber's conformity to Southern opinions that one of his sons entered the Confederate army. How Sumner was always trying to serve Lieber will be seen from a letter to him written from Boston, July 17, 1849:— I do not understand you; you are an enigma. Have I offended you in any way? Since your return from Europe I have heard of your writing to Longfellow, often to Howe, sometimes to Hillard, but never a line to me; and now comes a stray sheet, without date, without signature, without beginning, without end, without one word of friendship or one symptom of regard. I have sent you such poor publications as I had to offer, valuable only as containing cherished opinions and feelings; but you do not let me know even that they have come to hand. But let that pass. I have longed to write to you of late to speak of some matters interesting to you, but I did not feel encouraged to d
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 50: last months of the Civil War.—Chase and Taney, chief-justices.—the first colored attorney in the supreme court —reciprocity with Canada.—the New Jersey monopoly.— retaliation in war.—reconstruction.—debate on Louisiana.—Lincoln and Sumner.—visit to Richmond.—the president's death by assassination.—Sumner's eulogy upon him. —President Johnson; his method of reconstruction.—Sumner's protests against race distinctions.—death of friends. —French visitors and correspondents.—1864-1865. (search)
ou do not dislike the new judge John Lowell, appointed Judge of the United States District Court. I made in Boston. What pleasure I should have had in placing Hillard in some post of comfort and honor, if he had not made it impossible! A reference to George S. Hillard's political course. President Johnson a few months laterGeorge S. Hillard's political course. President Johnson a few months later appointed Mr. Hillard United States district attorney for the District of Massachusetts, and Sumner took pleasure in promoting his confirmation by the Senate. The death of Chief-Justice Taney, which had been anticipated for some months, took place October 10, 1864. Sumner had regarded his friend and coadjutor, S. P. Chase, asMr. Hillard United States district attorney for the District of Massachusetts, and Sumner took pleasure in promoting his confirmation by the Senate. The death of Chief-Justice Taney, which had been anticipated for some months, took place October 10, 1864. Sumner had regarded his friend and coadjutor, S. P. Chase, as the fittest person for the place, and had as early as the spring of the year urged the President to appoint him in the event of a vacancy. After that came the rupture between Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Chase, when the latter's resignation as Secretary of the Treasury was accepted, June 30. Other candidates were named on the death of th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
e drove with his colored friend J. B. Smith to T. wharf, where a party of friends had gathered to bid him good-by, as he went on board the tender,—among whom were Hillard, Bird, E. P. Whipple, G. H. Monroe, Martin Milmore, and E. L. Pierce. Most of them parted with him at the wharf, but Hillard, Pierce, and one or two others accomHillard, Pierce, and one or two others accompanied him to the steamship Malta, then lying below the lower lighthouse. While the tender was on its way, Sumner and Hillard sat for an hour or more together in the pilot-house. The senator seemed to be in good spirits, and his talk was of the improved facilities for at Atlantic voyage, the galleries be intended to visit, the reHillard sat for an hour or more together in the pilot-house. The senator seemed to be in good spirits, and his talk was of the improved facilities for at Atlantic voyage, the galleries be intended to visit, the rest from work before him, and the expectation of meeting his physician, Dr. Brown-Sequard, in Paris. His first anxiety as he reached the ship was, as always in his voyages, to see if his berth was long enough, and the carpenter was sent for to make a new one. Mr. Smith handed him a large bouquet, and his friends left him at 1 P. M
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 58: the battle-flag resolution.—the censure by the Massachusetts Legislature.—the return of the angina pectoris. —absence from the senate.—proofs of popular favor.— last meetings with friends and constituents.—the Virginius case.—European friends recalled.—1872-1873. (search)
, Holmes, Agassiz, R. H. Dana, Jr., J. T. Fields, S. G. Howe, George S. Hillard, Charles W. Eliot, J. Ingersoll Bowditch, W. Endicott, Jr., F A few days before leaving for Washington, Sumner dined with George S. Hillard, the friend of his youth, already smitten with paralysis. Hillard survived Sumner nearly five years, dying Jan. 21, 1879, at the age of seventy. To the end he took a constant interest in the preparan animated difference over a Latin quotation, finally settled in Mr. Hillard's favor,—Mr. Sumner saying some pleasant thing, to the effect that Mr. Hillard was as aggravatingly correct as of old. Indeed, it was an evening to be remembered; roused by the excitement, Mr. Hillard talkMr. Hillard talked like his old self, with hardly a trace of weakness. When they parted, it was almost in silence, with a long clasp of hands, as if each fe dinner for the man whole was to her the deliverer of her race. Mr. Hillard told Mr. Sumner what a solemn occasion it was to her. Mr. Sumner
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 59: cordiality of senators.—last appeal for the Civil-rights bill. —death of Agassiz.—guest of the New England Society in New York.—the nomination of Caleb Cushing as chief-justice.—an appointment for the Boston custom-house.— the rescinding of the legislative censure.—last effort in debate.—last day in the senate.—illness, death, funeral, and memorial tributes.—Dec. 1, 1873March 11, 1874. (search)
s familiar to his life,—through the streets of his native city, over the Cambridge bridge pressed so often by his feet, by the college he loved, by the homes of Story and Longfellow, along the shaded road he had so often trod with classmates and teachers, to that final resting-place of Boston's cherished dead, whose consecration he had witnessed in youth, there to renew companionship with Ashmun, Story, Greenleaf, Fletcher, Channing, Felton, Agassiz, and Everett, and to await The coining of Hillard and Longfellow. Here, beneath a stalwart oak, close by parents, brothers, and sisters, in the presence of classmates, friends, and of a sorrowing multitude, late in the afternoon when darkness was setting in, the Integer Vitae and A Mighty Fortress is our God were sung; the words of comfort, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord, were spoken, and the benediction given. Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, and Emerson stood by the open grave; and there also stood Wilson, the Vice-President