Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Edmund Quincy or search for Edmund Quincy in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 52: Tenure-of-office act.—equal suffrage in the District of Columbia, in new states, in territories, and in reconstructed states.—schools and homesteads for the Freedmen.—purchase of Alaska and of St. Thomas.—death of Sir Frederick Bruce.—Sumner on Fessenden and Edmunds.—the prophetic voices.—lecture tour in the West.—are we a nation?1866-1867. (search)
The appointments which he filled were as follows: Pontiac, Mich., October 7; Grand Rapids, October 8; Lansing, October 9; Detroit, October 10; Ann Arbor, October 11; Battle Creek, October 12: Milwaukee, Wis., October 14; Ripon, October 15; Janesville, October 16; Belvidere, Ill.. October 17; Rockford, October 18; Dubuque, la., October 19; Bloomington, Il., October 21; Peoria, October 22: Galesburg, October 25; Chicago, October 29; St. Louis, Mo., November 1; Jacksonville, Ill., November 2; Quincy, November 4. Aurora, November 5; La Porte, Ind., November 6: Toledo, O., November 7. A severe cold, accompanied with hoarseness and exhaustion, obliged him to give up his engagements in Iowa (except at Dubuque), and to rest a few days in Chicago. At Dubuque his welcome was from Hon. William B. Allison, then a member of the House, and since for a long period a senator, who made the arrangements for the lecture at that place. During the day of his last appointment, at Elkhart, a station bet
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 10 (search)
rtis, and James A. Hamilton received invitations which they were unable to accept. To Whittier he wrote: It will be a delight and a solace to me if I know that you are under my roof. he kept aloof from parties, but he could now return the courtesies which he had been receiving as a bachelor. Among those known to have dined with him are Seward, Motley, Fish, Conking, Hooper. Reverdy Johnson, ,John Sherman, Carl Schurz, Morrill of Vermont. General Sickles, General Webb, W. M. Evarts, Edmund Quincy, Agassiz. Ex-President Roberts of Liberia, Berthemy the French minister, Sir Edward Thornton the English minister, Gerolt the Prussian minister, and Blacque Bey the Turkish minister. Geore William Curtis, while at Washington as chairman of the Civil Service Commission, in June. 1871, though not accepting Sumner's invitation to occupy a room at his house, died with him every day, joining him afterwards in his drive, and the next winter was also almost daily at his house. Members of the