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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
jigs up and down the room, and makes himself at home in his own house. He is about sixty, with Marchioness to match; side dishes, I presume, but did not inquire. I have just been breakfasting at the Duke of Sutherland's superb palace. I will tell you next time about it. Lady Carlisle says I am nice and pretty, oh! how I love her! . . In another letter she says:-- I take some interest in everything I see — especially in all that throws light upon human prog. The Everetts Edward Everett was at that time American Minister to England. have given us a beautiful and most agreeable dinner: Dickens, Mrs. Norton, Moore, Landseer, and one or two others. Rogers says: I have three pleasures in the day: the first is, when I get up in the morning, and scratch myself with my hair mittens; the second is when I dress for dinner, and scratch myself with my hair mittens; the third is when I undress at night, and scratch myself with my hair mittens. . .. Beside this feast of hospital
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
meetings here, etc., etc. New England spunk seems to be pretty well up, but what will be done is uncertain as yet. One thing we have got: the Massachusetts Legislature has passed the personal liberty bill, which will effectually prevent the rendition of any more fugitive slaves from Massachusetts. Another thing, the Tract Society here (orthodox) has put out old Dr. Adams, who published a book in favor of slavery; a third thing, the Connecticut legislature has withdrawn its invitation to Mr. Everett to deliver his oration before them, in consequence of his having declined to speak at the Sumner meeting in Faneuil Hall.... To her sister Annie Cincinnati, May 26, 1857. Casa Greenis. Dearest Annie, Fiancee de marbre et Femme de glace, Heaven knows what I have not been through with since I saw you — dust, dirt, dyspepsia, hotels, railroads, prairies, Western steamboats, Western people, more prairies, tobacco juice, captains of boats, pilots of ditto, long days of jolting in the c
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
gan of the fair. There were ten numbers of the paper: it lies before us now, a small folio volume of eighty pages. Title and management are indicated at the top of the first column:-- The Boatswain's Whistle. Editorial Council. Edward Everett.A. P. Peabody. John G. Whittier.J. R. Lowell. O. W. Holmes.E. P. Whipple. Editor. Julia Ward Howe. Each member of the Council made at least one contribution to the paper; but the burden fell on the Editor's shoulders. She worked n number of persons in order to make up a set of teeth for a party who wants it and who does not want to pay for it. We should like to linger over the pages of the Boatswain's Whistle ; to quote from James Freeman Clarke's witty dialogues, Edward Everett's stately periods, Dr. Holmes's sparkling verse; to describe General Grant, the prize ox, white as driven snow and weighing 3900 pounds, presented by the owner to President Lincoln and by him to the fair. Did we not see him drawn in triumph
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
d dinner as a thing of courses and remorses! November 2. Took reluctant leave of the Jewett house and the trio, Sarah, Mary, and Annie Fields. We had a wonderful dish of pigeons for lunch .... It was delightful to see our mother and Miss Jewett together. They were the best of playmates, having a lovely intimacy of understanding. Their talk rippled with light and laughter. Such stories as they told! such songs as they sang! who that heard will ever forget our mother's story of Edward Everett in his youth? He was to take three young ladies to drive, and had but the one horse; he wished to please them all equally. To the first he said, The horse is perfectly fresh now; you have him in his best condition. To the second he said, The horse was a little antic at first, so you will have the safer drive. To the third he said, Now that the other two have had their turn, we need not hasten back. You can have the longest drive. It is recalled that during this visit, when Laura
78. Emerson, R. W., I, 70, 72, 87, 139, 140, 177, 209, 290; II, 10, 50, 56, 61, 76, 77, 120, 137, 143, 250, 263, 304, 363. Letter of, I, 139. Emerson, Mrs. R. W., II, 61, 76, 87. England, I, 85, 93, 312; II, 9, 10, 21, 164, 296. England, Church of, II, 174. Ephesus, II, 5. Europe, I, 138; II, 4, 12, 188, see also separate countries. Evangelides, Christy, I, 42, 272. Evans, Lawrence, II, 324. Evening Express, Newport, II, 54. Evening Post, N. Y., II, 156. Everett, Edward, I, 87, 168, 210, 211; II, 317. Fairchild, Sarah, II, 157. Faneuil Hall, II, 88, 190. Fano, I, 272, Farinata, I, 174. Farman, Mr., II, 36. Farrar, Canon, II, 252. Fast Day, abolition of, II, 193. Faucit, Helen, I, 87. Fellows, Sir, Charles, I, 85. Feltham, Owen, I, 13, 40. Felton, Cornelius, I, 74, 120; II, 44. Felton, Mrs., Cornelius, I, 124; II, 43, 228. Felu, Charles, I, 279, 280; II, 12, 173. Female Poets of America, I, 17, 131. Fenn, Mr