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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
tand the King of Prussia has about 200,000 men constantly under arms, and if necessary he can increase his force to two millions. This shows the estimation in which he holds your single self! Years later, the King sent Dr. Howe a gold medal in consideration of his work for the blind: by a singular coincidence, its money value was found to equal the sum which the Doctor had been forced to pay for board and lodging in the prison of Berlin. Making a detour, the party journeyed through Switzerland and the Austrian Tyrol, spent some weeks in Vienna, and a month in Milan, where they met Count Gonfalonieri, one of the prisoners of Spielberg. Julia had known two of these sufferers, Foresti and Albinola, in New York, where they lived for many years, beloved and respected. Hearing the talk of these men, and seeing Italy bound hand and foot in temporal and spiritual fetters, she was deeply impressed by the apparent hopelessness of the outlook for the Italian patriots. By what miracle,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
fact that a high price was set on his head) and the various colonies of refugees, the Doctor felt that further aid must be obtained. Accordingly, the journeyings of the little party after leaving Greece were for the most part only less hurried than the earlier ones, the exception being a week of enchantment spent in Venice, awaiting the Doctor, who had been called back to Athens at the moment of departure. The Journal tells of Verona, Innsbriick, Munich. Then came flying glimpses of Switzerland, with a few days' rest at Geneva, where she had the happiness of meeting her sister once more; finally, Paris and the Exposition of 1867. After a visit to Napoleon's tomb, she writes: Spent much of the afternoon in beginning a piece of tapestry after a Pompeiian pattern copied by me on the spot. Worsted work was an unfailing accompaniment of her journeyings in those days; indeed, until age and weariness came upon her, she never failed to have some piece of work on hand. When her ey
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
e German officers commanding in France, urging them to spare the works of art in the conquered country. Through her efforts the studios of Rosa Bonheur and other famous painters escaped destruction. The early part of September was spent in Switzerland. Chamounix filled the travellers with delight. They walked up the Brevant, rode to the Mer de Glace on muleback. The great feature, however, of this visit to Switzerland was the Geneva Congress, called by Mrs. Josephine Butler to protest aSwitzerland was the Geneva Congress, called by Mrs. Josephine Butler to protest against the legalizing of vice in England. At the Congress to-day — spoke in French.... I spoke of the two sides, active and passive, of human nature, and of the tendency of the education given to women to exaggerate the passive side of their character, whereby they easily fall victims to temptation. Spoke of the exercise of the intellectual faculties as correcting these tendencies — education of women in America progress made. Coeducation and the worthier relations it induces between young
ullivan, Sir, Arthur, II, 9. Sullivan, Richard, II, 64. Sully, Due de, I, 192. Sumner, Mrs., I, 225. Sumner, Albert, I, 151. Sumner, Charles, I, 71, 74-77, 116, 121, 127, 133, 149, 151, 152, 153, 168, 200, 205, 206, 226, 227, 246, 283, 344, 381; II, 108, 128. Letter of, I, 75. Sumner, Mrs., Charles, I, 255, 283. Sumner, George, I, 151. Sutherland, Duchess of, I, 82, 85, 95. Sutherland, Duke of, I, 87. Swedenborg, Emanuel, I, 135. Swinburne, A. C., II, 72. Switzerland, I, 94, 278; I, 20. Syra, I, 272. Tacitus, I, 177, 222. Tacoma, II, 133, 153. Taft, W. H., II, 192, 388, 394. Taglioni, Marie, I, 97. Talbot, Emily, I, 287. Talleyrand, Princess, II, 247. Talmage, DeWitt, II, 101. Talmud, II, 46. Tappan, Caroline, II, 142. Tasso, Torquato, II, 32. Taverna, Contessa di, II, 253, 255. Taylor, Father, I, 72, 346. Tebbets, Mrs., II, 227. Tennyson, Alfred, Lord, I, 160; II, 203, 227, 247. Terry, Louisa, I, 267, 2