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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 522 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 106 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 104 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 92 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 46 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 46 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 22 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers. You can also browse the collection for Quebec (Canada) or search for Quebec (Canada) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, chapter 5 (search)
ewells of those two we had detained to take with us, and brought them some fish, uttering many words which we did not understand, making signs that they would not remove the cross we had set up. Iii.—Cartier ascends the St. Lawrence as far as Quebec. [this took place on Cartier's second voyage. He sailed from St. Malo, may 19, 1535, and reached the mouth of the St. Lawrence, which he ascended, hoping to find a passage to the west.] Our captain then caused our boats to be set in orde. The first name was given because Cartier reached it on the festival of the Holy Cross. for on that day we came thither. Near unto it there is a village, whereof Donnacona is lord; and there he keepeth his abode: it is called Stadacona, Now Quebec. as goodly a plot of ground as possibly may be seen, and therewithal very fruitful, full of goodly trees even as in France, as oaks, elms, ashes, walnut trees, maple-trees, citrons, vines, and white-thorns, that bring forth fruit as big as any da
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, chapter 12 (search)
[this narrative is of great interest, as showing the mode of early Indian warfare, and the way in which the French at once modified it by teaching them the use of fire-arms. It also illustrates the way in which the French explored the interior of the country, even before the English had colonized the coasts, thus giving rise to that dispute out of which grew the series of French and Indian wars. Samuel de Champlain first sailed for America in 1603, and was the founder and governor of Quebec.] Left the rapid Now Chambly, Canada East. of the said River of the Iroquois on the 2d of July (1609). All the savages A tribe of Algonquins. began carrying their canoes, arms, and traps over land, about a league and a half, to avoid the current and force of the rapid. This was quickly effected. They immediately launched the canoes into the water, two men in each with their baggage, whilst one of the men went by land about a league and a half, which was the probable extent of sa