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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1854. (search)
ession till I lost it on my removal to my present rooms. The device was a bull in wild career and the motto, When I wave my sword on high, See the Saxon porkers fly. We had been reading Ivanhoe at the time, as illustrative of the reign of Richard Coeur-de-Lion, and James hit upon Front-de-Boeuf as his pattern. His relish for the heroic made him delight in the poetry which recounts the deeds of valor in stirring verse; and he seemed never weary, even when he became a man, of reading Macaulay's Lays, Aytoun's Border Minstrelsy, and Scott's Poems. On the eve of actual battle, James was heard quoting from Henry of Navarre. Being so full of romantic feeling, it was to be expected that he would have a vivid perception of beauty, and so, indeed, he had; it was to him the manifestation of God in the world. He had a fine ear, and his musical taste was apparent when so small that he had to climb upon the music-stool before the piano, and twine his legs around its stem to keep from fa
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1857. (search)
and literary tastes which had been so marked in him during his college life, but from which it might have been apprehended that the activities of business and army life would have a tendency to divorce him. When he and his brothers left home for the army, it was remarked that, though they, unwilling to be drawn aside from the study of their new profession, were content to take with them only books of a purely military character, he could not be happy unless he had Shakespeare, Tennyson, and Macaulay for his daily companions. The hard-worn volumes give evidence of his constant use of them. After leaving college he repeatedly expressed himself tempted to follow the bent of his tastes, and continue his education in some foreign university; but other considerations had weight with him, and he soon turned his attention to manufacturing, with the purpose, to use his own language, of making himself master of its theory. He was thus occupied until the summer of 1859, when it was proposed
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1860. (search)
y and the man. In many things his mind exhibited great maturity, while in others it had all the characteristics of early youth. He was especially fond of historical and philosophical reading. His knowledge of history, particularly of English history, was extensive and accurate. His powers of reasoning were excellent. His memory was extraordinary; he was not only able to repeat long ballads, of which he was very fond, but could even recite pages of prose which he had not seen for years. Macaulay was his favorite author; and it was his delight to deliver from memory his long and finished periods, with an emphasis which no one who has heard him can forget. His comrades of the mess-room will long remember how he enlivened the dulness of many a winter evening by reciting Thackeray's Ballad of the Drum, or some stirring lay of Aytoun. Napoleon was his favorite hero. When a boy of ten, he would carry about a life of the Emperor under his arm, and read and reread it, and refuse to part
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1863. (search)
er again, he took up his studies and reading, necessarily intermitted during the passage round the Cape. A leaf from his journal will show what he was doing in that respect. Tuesday, June 26h. —Forenoon below; finished the first volume of Macaulay's England. I am glad to say that, in spite of the contrary predictions of my friends before I left home, I have not as yet neglected my reading and study, though my time has been much more limited than I expected, and consequently I have not acnone of my ability to read them easily, but from the want of grammars I feel that my knowledge of them is not nearly so exact as it once was. The Holy Bible,—the reading of which has been a daily duty and pleasure to me,—John Foster, De Quincey, Macaulay, Shakespeare, Tennyson, and Dickens have formed my leisure reading, if that time which I have stolen from my sleep can be called leisure. I can fairly say that they have been my greatest pleasure ever since I left home. I hope that a year's ti<