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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1842. (search)
the hospital, where Dr. N. Ward had all the necessary arrangements made. He was laid in a box, wearing, except the coat, the clothes he wore when slain,—wrapped in a blanket, and the coffin filled and covered with green leaves. Our good Quartermaster Mason endeavored to have him carried to New Orleans, to be sent North from that city, but found this was forbidden at this season by general orders. So he was laid in a beautiful little space near our camping-ground of a few nights previous, anhis side Captain Bailey, of the Fifty-third Massachusetts, and Lieutenant——of the——. Our Quartermaster and Dr. Thompson were the only officers who attended the funeral; all the others being compelled, by their duty, to be at the front. Lieutenant Mason tells me that his face had its most natural expression,— one of perfect tranquillity and repose. At the grave a few remarks were made by the chaplain of the Fifty-third Massachusetts, Mr. Whittemore. . . . . Your affectionate
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1852. (search)
1856 he found himself well enough to go into business, and formed, with his cousin, John H. Reed, the firm of Reed and Hooper, for the management and agency of the Bay State Iron Company, a connection which lasted until his death. For mercantile life he was admirably adapted by character, by habit, and by inherited taste and ability. He soon became most favorably known among business men, and was on the high road to success. In October, 1857, he married Alice, the youngest daughter of Jonathan Mason, Esq. Their only child, Isabella Weyman, was born in January, 1859. A happier domestic life would be hard to find. Had it not been for the bodily disease which was constantly throwing its cloud over him, it would seem as if fortune had now left him nothing to desire. From the very commencement of the Rebellion, he had been anxious to bear his part in the war, but his feeble health and urgent business were obstacles hard to surmount. The responsibilities of this business were render
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1858. (search)
Hannah (Rogers) Mason, and the grandson of Jonathan Mason, who was United States Senator from Massacthe Potomac, and advance towards the enemy. Dr. Mason wrote home in great spirits at the prospect on. Unfortunately the Surgeons, Drs. Dana and Mason, while selecting a house for the accommodationen to the Headquarters of General Lee. Here Dr. Mason unexpectedly met his former classmate at Camg their horses, equipments, and attendants. Dr. Mason's replies to General Lee's questions proved factory to Colonel Greene. In a letter to Dr. Mason's father, referring to these incidents, Colossed great admiration of his assistant. Dr. Mason told me, when he made his report, that he wohe would make an excellent line officer. Dr. Mason, on writing home, said that Colonel Greene h who really knew him. The delineation of Dr. Mason's character in this extract will be accepteday possibly believe with the writer, that if Dr. Mason had been permitted to follow his inclination[2 more...]
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1859. (search)
the advice of his physician, he gave up college life and went to Europe. After an extensive tour in England, and the west and north of Europe, he returned home and decided to go into business with his father. To gain a thorough knowledge of his future occupation, he visited Bombay, Australia, Batavia, and Manilla; and on returning, after a few weeks' stay at home, he went on a second voyage to Madras and Calcutta, upon his father's business. During his absence his father died; and when Mason returned to Boston in 1860, he found his prospects in business suddenly obscured. His duty was now to remain at home, and his sturdy manhood did much to cheer the mourning family. Whatever might have been his disappointment, he studiously concealed it, and by an assumed cheerfulness deceived casual observers as to the true state of his feelings; and, though too proud to solicit either advice or assistance from any one, he was on the alert to enter upon some congenial business. When the
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1860. (search)
which the enemy was pushing. The colors of the Northern regiments and the battle-flags of the Southern troops waved thickly in this valley of death. Northern and Southern soldiers fought gallantly and fell thickly here, and the victory was with us. Few of the Southern troops who charged our lines got safely back. Of those who were not killed, the majority threw down their arms, hopeless of retreating safely under our fire. In a letter written in the following September by Abbott to Captain Mason, one of the best officers of the Twentieth, who was disabled by a wound received in this engagement, the following passage occurs:— In the midst of the execution of the order to form line to the right, I looked round and saw several companies on the centre and left going to the rear. I immediately suspected the truth, that the order had been misunderstood to be one to go to the rear, with the object of forming a new line not outflanked by the Rebels, who had occasioned the first
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
Brig.-Gen., II. 424. Marshall, Isaac, II. 427. Martindale, J. H., Brig.-Gen., II. 167. Mason, Albee, I. 193. Mason, A., Lieut., I. 69. Mason, E. B., Lieut., Memoir, I. 409-414. Mason, H. C., Capt., II. 96. Mason, Hannah R., I. Mason, E. B., Lieut., Memoir, I. 409-414. Mason, H. C., Capt., II. 96. Mason, Hannah R., I. 409. Mason, Jonathan, I. 193, 409;. Mason, W. P., I. 409. Meade, G. G., Maj.-Gen., I. 14, 219;.220,427, 428; II. 70, 71;, 75, 100, 101, 222, 224, 261, 301,302,421. Means, J. O., Rev., II. 156. Merrill, Samuel, Col., I. 126. MerrittMason, H. C., Capt., II. 96. Mason, Hannah R., I. 409. Mason, Jonathan, I. 193, 409;. Mason, W. P., I. 409. Meade, G. G., Maj.-Gen., I. 14, 219;.220,427, 428; II. 70, 71;, 75, 100, 101, 222, 224, 261, 301,302,421. Means, J. O., Rev., II. 156. Merrill, Samuel, Col., I. 126. Merritt, C. M., Capt., II. 35. Miles, N. A., Brig.-Gen., I. 111. Miller, Adam, Lieut., I. 322. Mills, Anna C. L., II. 133. Mills, C. H., II. 133. MillS, C. J., Brev. Maj., Memoir, II. 133-141. Montgomery, James, Col., II. 194, 463;. MMason, W. P., I. 409. Meade, G. G., Maj.-Gen., I. 14, 219;.220,427, 428; II. 70, 71;, 75, 100, 101, 222, 224, 261, 301,302,421. Means, J. O., Rev., II. 156. Merrill, Samuel, Col., I. 126. Merritt, C. M., Capt., II. 35. Miles, N. A., Brig.-Gen., I. 111. Miller, Adam, Lieut., I. 322. Mills, Anna C. L., II. 133. Mills, C. H., II. 133. MillS, C. J., Brev. Maj., Memoir, II. 133-141. Montgomery, James, Col., II. 194, 463;. Moore, A. B., Col., II. 240. Moore, S. W., II. 229. Morgan, E. D., Gov., I. 11, 91;. Morgan, J., II. 241. Morris, Josephine M., I. 90. Morse, C. F., Lieut.-Col., II. 273, 274;. Mosby, J. S., Col. (Rebel service), 1.291,300, 303; II.